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quaintance, a remarkably brave young warrior from The principal drawback in the character of the people man. The Senatours entringe in to the court, what Aduchům, who only ten days before had received a under our notice, is their recklessness in shedding with the sodayn assembling of the wyues and of their concussion of the brain and other injuries by a fall human blood. They are certainly not blood-thirsty, request, were right sore astonied, than the childe with his horse. On the second day of his visit, when but seem to know no other arbiter in disputes than cold | Papyrius stode forth, and enformed the senatours, the roar of the firing was almost incessarit, he became steel or the bullet. Much must be allowed, however, how his mother wold haue compelled him to ytter the perfectly miserable; mutteringly bewailing, in the for position and training, and, taking such things into secreto counsa yle: and howe he to content her mynde, corner where he lay, his hard fate, that he had not account, we would say that, upon the whole, tlie Cir- feyned that leasynge. For which dede the Senatours died to prevent his being left to be degraded to a cassians soem to have in them the materials of a noble right hyghly commended the childes fydelite and woman. His impatience at length becamo so great, race of people. Let us hope, that in the event of a wytte. And forth with they made a law, that no that he had himself dressed to set forth, notwithstand new arrangement of eastern affairs, our statesmen child after that (saue only Papirius) shuld come in ing that his right arm is almost powerless, his right will at the same time discover some mode of restoring to the parlement house with his father. And for his eye entirely so (from the falling of the eyelid), and peace to the north-eastern shores of the Black Sca. great prudence in that tender age he had gyuen to the vision of the left greatly impaired, and all my The following closing anecdote will show the hym, to his great honour, this surname Pretextatus. arguments about the imprudence of such an attempt; honesty of the Circassians. “During almost the Wherby ye may cc, that the bygh treasure of man, but on coming to the examination of his hazirs (the whole four months I have been in this valley, I have and greattest grace, resteth in well ordrynge of the cartouche-tubes on the breast), he found that some slept alone out of doors ; first under a great pear-tree, tonge. The moste prudent poete Hesiodus sapth : kind friend, during his late insensibility, had wisely on a green within the enclosure of this hamlet, and lat- The tonge shulde not ronne at large, but be hydde as relieved them of the powder.” Osman, however, went terly on a stage, which Hassan Bey, of his own accord, a precicis treasure. For of all the membres of man, off immediately ; but whether he found means to go ordered to be erected for me in an orchard, slightly the tonge yll ordered is the worste. The tonge blasto the field or otherwise, our author did not learn. enciosed, and which overhangs a deeply-wooded glen. phemeth God: The tonge sklaundereth thy nepghNor are the old men one whit behind their juniors in This glen communicates with the valley, in which bour. The tonge breaketh peace, and stereth vp chivalrous gallantry. Mr Bell met an aged chief who there are no houses all the way to the sea. On my cruell warre, of all thynges to mankynde moste mishad left his home for the field, and was told the fol- couch, on this stage (which in fine weather, such as chefull, the tonge is a brcker of baudrye: the tonge lowing anecdote of him. "I have just heard from we generally hare, is my house), sundry articles of setteth frendes at debate: The tonge with flatterynge, K úshi Vardan, who says that a few days since Hasesh high value here, such as my watch, silver snuff-box, detraction, and wanton tales enfecteth pure and clene and he having found themselves in presence of a con- siiver-mounted dagger, knives, &c., lie throughout the myndes : the tonge without sworde or venome stransiderable body of Russian horse, the former

, whose day frequentiy (during my walks for exercise) quite gleth thy brother and frende : and brefcly to speake, beard is already all blanched, turned to him gaily (for unprotected ; and at night, the four plum-trees which the tonge teacheth cursed heresyes, and of good Chrishe is full of gaiety and spirit), and merclý saying, forin my leafy shelter are hung with my clothes and tiens maketh Antichristes.

Follow me,' dashed in among the enemy with his other appurtenances ; yet have I never missed a singlo sabre, and cut his way through without receiving any article, although my retreat is well known to all the

Of kynge Lowes of France and the husbande man. injury. Vardan, who enjoys a high character for neighbours round ; groups of whom, and of strangers, What tyme kynge Lowes of Fraunce, the xi. of bravery, candidly owns he had not courage to follow almost daily seat themselves on the grass arcund me. that name, bycause of the trouble that was in the such an example.”

Nor must it be forgotten that my person also is of no realme, kepte hym solfe in Burgoyne, he chaunced by The female slaves who are sent from Circassia, are little value, on account of the price set upon it by the occasion of huntinge to come acqueynted with one principally, if not entirely, derived from an inferior munificent offer of the Russian general in the neigh- Conon a homely husbande man, and a plaine meanynge caste, who stand in the relation of serfs to the landed bourhood.” The reward was 2000 silver roubles. folowe. In whiche maner of men the hygh princes proprietors of the country, as is the case in Russia.

greatly delyte them. To this mans house thé kynge Serf-girls are still sold by the Circassian proprietors,

ofte resorted from huntynge. And with great plea

SHAKSPEARE'S JEST-BOOK. though the disgraceful trade is much less extensive

sure he wolde eate radysshes rotes with hym. Within than formerly. Yct, when their fate is at the worst, In Much ado about Nothing, Benedick alleges of Bea a whyle after whan Lowes was restored home, and theso poor girls have hopes, which soothe their distress. trice that she had her good wit out of the Hundred had the gouernaunce of France in his hande, this “ Two sert-girls of this establishment-about twelve Merry Tales. Overlooking an erroneous surmise of husbande man was counsailed by his wyfe, to take a or thirteen years of age have just been sold to a mer Mr Steevens, this book seems to have been a small goodly sorte of radysshe rotes and to go and gyue chant going to Constantinople. Twelve horse-loads black-letter volume published in the reign of Henry them to the kyng, and put him in mynd of the good of merchandise have arrived in payment of them a VIII., under the title of “ Tales and Quick Answeres, chere, that he had made hym at his house. Conon sight that sickens my British stomach, however it very mery, and pleasant to rede,” and which, consisting wolde nat assent therto, what folysshe woman quod may operate on a Turk's. The girls have been here to of a centenary of anecdotes, had probably come to he, the great princes remembre nat suche smalle pleakiss my host's hand at parting, on which occasion the bear the familiar appellation of the Hundred Merry sures. But for all that she wolde not reste tyll Conon hearts of both of them seemed greatly convulsed ; and Tales. A copy of this volume was in the Duke of chose out a great syght of the fayrest rootes, and toke one with reddish hair (and therefore keener feelings) Roxburghe's celebrated collection (now in that of the his iourney towarde the courte. But as he went by shed floods of tears, which wont nigh to set mine Duke of Marlborough), and from it a new edition was the way, be yete vp all the radysshes saue one of the a-flowing. Parting, however, is always painful;

and produced a few years ago,* with the additional title greattest. I trust these two girls may be sustained by the ambi- of “The Hundred Merry Tales, or Shakspeare's Jest Conon peaked in to the courte, and stode where the tion 1 believe common here among the youth of their Book."

kynge shulde passe by : By and by the kynge knews sex-of becoming wives to nabobs of Stambal.” The contents of this volume are extremely curious. hym, and called hym to hym. Conon stepte to the

One of the most remarkable features in tho social The anecdotes strongly illustrate the simplicity and kynge and presented his rote with a gladde chere. policy of the Circassians, consists in the existence of rudeness of the middle ages, and also, we fear, speak and the kynge toke it more gladly, and bad one, numerous septs or fraternities, the members of each of of a time when men were more easily amused than that was nerest to hym, to laye it vp amonge those which hold themselves to be of one stock, and do not they are at present. The language is extremely jewels that he best loued : And than commaunded intermarry. Tho young people of each fraternity look quaint, the construction faulty, the words variously Conon to dyne with hym. Whan dyner was done he upon one another in the light of brothers and sisters. A and venerably ill-spelt, and the stops almost invariably thanked Conon: and whan the kyng sawe that he union of this kind may contain from two or three hun. misplaced. The moral refiections which are made to wolde departe home, he commaunded to guye him a dred to two or three thousand families. The members accompany many of the stories is an amusing feature thousande crownes of golde for his radisshe rote. are bound to protect each other in danger and distress, in the collection ; for their naïreté frequently excites Whan this was knowen in the kinges house, one of the and to assist in paying those fines which constituté a smile, even when the “ mery tale” itself would fail court gaue the kyng a propre mynion horse. The the chief legal punishments of the country. If a to do so. The following selections from the volume kyng perceiuing, that he dyd it, bicause of the libemember is condemned to capital punishment, his will, we think, make good these remarks :

ralite shewed vnto Conon, with very glad chere he fraternity inflict it. Altogether, these fraternities of

toke the gyft, and counsailed with his lordes, how Circassia bring one forcibly in mind of the Scottish

Of hym that felle in to the fyre.

and with what gyft he myght recompence the horse, clans. Mr Bell mentions the following case illustra A felowe that was frowarde to his wyfe, vsed to be that was so goodly and faire. This meane while the tive of the criminal procedures of Circassia.

oute drynkynge many tymes verye late. So on a picke thank had a meruailous great hope, and thought passed the temporary court of justice-a thatched nyghte he taryed so longe oute, that his wyse wente in his mynde thus : If he so wel recompensed the shed-we had further proof of proceedings having to beddo, and badde her mayde make a good fyre, and radysshe roto, that was gyuen of a rusticall map : terminated, by its being set fire to, as is invariably tarye vp for hym. About xij. of the clocke home he howe moche more largely wyl he recompence suche done. The delinquent in this case appears to have came, and as he stode warmyngo him by the fyre his an horse, that is gyuen of me that am of the courte : been insane, as he had killed a boy, and wounded two hede was so tottye, that he felle in to the fyre. The wiian euery man had sayde his mynde, as though the other persons of a family he had conceived himself maydo seing him fall ranne yp cryenge to her mais- kynge had counsayled aboute a great weyghty matter, aggrieved by, and bad entered a house for the purpose tres, and sayd: Alas my maister is fallen and lyeth and that they hadde longe fedde the pycke thanks of killing one of my countrymen whom he expected longe straughte in the fyre. No force mayde, said with vayne hope, at last the kyng sayd. I remembra to find there. His fraternity had consequently put ber maistres, let him lyc and take his pleasure in his nowe, what we shal gyue hym: and so hu called 082 him to death in the usual manner, by throwing him owne house, where so euer him listeth.

of his lordes, and badde hym in his eare, go fetche into the sea with his arms tied ; yet his family and fraternity are bound by the Circassian ideas of justice

Of Papirius pretextatus.

hym that that he founde in his chambre (and told

hym the place where) featly folded vp in sylke. Anone to pay the legal fines for his offences. It may easily Aulus Gellius reherseth, how the Senatours of Rome he came and brought the radysshe roote, and euen as be conceived that such institutions, though at variance on a tyme belde a great counsaile. Before which it was folded vp, the kyng with his owne hande gate with our notions of justice in the west, arc yet highly tyme the senatours chyldren, called of their garmentes it to the courtier, sayenge : we suppose your horse is conducive to good order, each family and fraternity Pueri pretextati, vsed to come in to the parlement well recompensed with this ie well, for it hath cost being, deeply interested in watching the conduct of house with theyre fathers. So at this tyme a cbylde a thousande crownes. The courtier went his way each individual connected with them, lest they should called Papyrius, cam in with his father and herde the neuer so glad, and whan he had vnfolded it, he found be amerced for his misdemeanour.

great counsayl tlie which was straytely commaunded none other treasure, but the radysshe rote almoste The fines payable in this instance were two hundred to be kept secrete tyll hit was decreed. Whan this wethered. oxen for a boy killed, and thirty for a young man and chylde came home, his mother asked him what the two for a woinan wounded, the latter haring bcen less counsaile was. The chylde answered, hit oughte nat Of the plough man that sayde his pater noster. severely injured. Or those only the former has yet to be tolde. Now was his mother more desyrous to A rude vplandisshe plough man, whiche on a tyme been exacted ; the parents of the boy having received knowe lit than she was before : wherfore she enquered reprouynge a good holy father sayd, that he coude the value of sixty oxen, and their fraternity the re more straitly and more violentlye. The chylde beinge say all his prayers with a hole mynde and stedfaste mainder. The payment of the other two fixed for soce constrayned of his mother, shortelye deuysed a intention, without thinkyng on any other thynge. next suinmer, and will be proportionably divided propre merve leasynge. It is reasoned in the par- To whome the good holy man saydo : Go to, saye ons among the sufferers and their fraternities. The cause lemente (quod he) whether of both shulde be more Pater noster to the ende, and thynke on none other for such division is, that the family and fraternity of profytable for the comon welth, a man to haue ji. thynge, and I wyll gyue the myn horse. That sail the delinquent are amenable in similar proportions.

wiues or els a woman ii. husbandes. Whan she harde I do, quod the plough man, and so began to save, So far as I can learn, insanity is almost unknown him say so, her mynde was pacified : and forth with Pater nusser qui es in celis, tyll he canio to Sanctificctar It appears to be a curso attendant on she wente and tolde hit to the other matrones.

nomen tuum, and than his thought moued bim to aske the complications of civilisation and commerce." On the morowe a great company of the moste this question : yea but shall baue the sadil and bride

We havo now quoted pretty freely from Jir Bell's notable wyues of Rome came to the parlemente house withal? And so he lost his bargain.
volumes, endeavouring to choose such passages as would weping, and humbly prayen : that rather one woman
at once illustrate the character of the Circassians, and shuld be niaryed vnto ii. men than ii. wemen to one

Of the fryer that brayde in his sermon. exbibit the rory interesting nature of the work, which

A fryer that preached to the people on a tyms, has the additional attraction of numerous engravings.

* London: J. Chidley. 1831.

wolde otherwhyle crio out a loude (as the maner of

“ As we

in this country.

some fooles is) whicho brayenge dyd so moue a woman the conduct of almost all experienced bankers of the of Mr Watt, the son of the celebrated James Watt. that stode herynge his sermone, that she wepto. He present day. They pushed their accommodation for Mr Bracebridge set up a bank at Warwick ; but he parceyuyng that, thought in his mynde her conscience the purpose of acquiring business, or they granted was soon driven out of that field from sheer unfitness being prycked with his wordes, had caused her to such accommodation on the representations of partios, to conduct so responsible an office; he paid all the wepe. wherfore whan his sermon was done, he called too readily. Among these was a bank at Honiton, creditors of the bank, and gave it up. The losses, the woman to hym, and asked what

was the cause of in Devonshire, which failed many years since. It is however, from his mercantile adventures had reduced her wepynge, and whether his wordes moued her to said that the accommodation granted to this bank at him to such straits, that he was constrained to sell his wepe or nat. Forsoth mayster (sayde she) I am a its highest point considerably exceeded L.230,000. It reversionary interest in those two valuable estates of poure wydowe : and whan rnyne husbande dyed, he was given principally in the shape of bills, accepted Aston Hall in Staffordshire, and Brereton Hall in lefte me but one asse, whiche gotte parte of my by Messrs Hammersley and Co.; and it was an un- Cheshire. And we believe it to be not extravagant to lyuynge, the which asse the wolues haue slayne : and derstood arrangement between the parties, that the say that, if this gentleman had been content to live nowe when I hard your hyghe voyce, I remembred sum of this kind of circulation to be constantly kept within his income, and had not turned banker and my selve asse, for so he was wonte to braye bothe afloat should be about L.200,000. . Bills of this de- soap-boiler, he would at this moment be in possession nyghte and daye. And this good mayster caused me scription, drawn on purpose to obtain bank-notes by of landed property worth very little short of a million to wepe. Thus the lewde brayer, rather than preacher, discounting them, could not at this day be made to sterling, which is for ever alienated from his family. confuted with his folysshenes, wente his waye : which work at all ; they even then mored heavily in certain Nothing could more forcibly illustrate the different thinkynge for his brayenge lyke an asse to be reputed quarters, and we beliere, if it had not been for the consequences flowing from providenco and improvifor the beste preacher, deserued well to here hym selfe friendly aid and co-operation of a director of the Bank dence, than the fact that a part of that same estate of to be compared to an asse.

of England, now deceased, the whole scheme of raising Aston Hall was purchased by Mr Whitehead, banker For truely one to suppose hym selfe wyse

money by this kind of circulation would have broken of Warwick; and from its proximity to Birmingham, Is vnto folysshones the very fyrste gryce. down much sooner than it did.

it is likely to become a property of great value. Before the failure of this Devonshire Bank, Mossrs Why do we refer to these circumstances ? Because Of the wyse man Piso, and his seruant. Hammersley and Co. reduced the balance from its they are, even in this naked sketch, pregnant with inA certayn wise man called Piso, to auoyde greuous highest point,

which is variously stated at sums be- struction. A great London bank has stopped payianglynge, commaunded, that his seruauntes shulde tween L.280,000 and L.300,000, as well as they could, ment, holding deposits which are stated to amount to saye nothinge, but answere to that that thei were by getting available securities and otherwise. For the L.650,000, and having promissory-notes circulating in demaunded, and no more. Vpon a daye the sayde final balance, which, after all practicable reduction all parts of the continent of Europe, amounting to Piso made a dyner, and sent a seruaunt to desire had been effected, amounted, we believe, to L.180,000, a very considerable sum ; and, as we believe, it is Clodius the Consull to come and dyne with him. they accepted, we were many years since informed, brought to this state, not from any misconduct on the Aboute the houre of diner al the guestes came saue 18. or ls. 6d. in the pound; consequently, the real part of the late possessor and director of the office, as Clodius, for whom they taryed tyli hit was almosto loss upon this account would not be less than from far as the management of the funds intrusted to him nyght, and euer sente to loke if he came. At laste L.160,000 to L.170,000. It would be instructive if we is concerned, but from the misconduct of those who Piso sayde to his seruaunt: Diddest thou byd the could tell by what means and gradations borrowers preceded him. Mr Hugh Hammersley inherited a Consull come to dyner ? yes truely sayde he. Why contrived to involve Messrs Hammersley and Co. in lucrative business encumbered with dreadful losses. cometh he nat thán ? quod Piso. Mary, quod the this large and ruinous liability, The bankers at Honi- A long course of years might have brought about solseruaunt, he sayde he wolde nat. Wherfore toldest ton made a great show of possessions in land, upon rency, and laid a solid foundation of wealth. We are me nat so incontinent ? quod Piso. Bycause, quod which securities for the advances would be given; but, bound to explain these things, and to trace the evil the seruaunt, ye dyd nat aske me.

according to our information, these were no further to its sources. These sources are mainlyBy this tale seruauntes may lerne to kepe theyr available for the payment of the great debt than we 1. A loss on Mr T. Hammersley leaving maisters biddyng : but yet I aduise maysters therby have above stated. Whether the then existing part tba firm of Morland, say

L.20,000 to take hede, howe they make an iniunction.

ners of the firm of Hammersley and Co. took each his 2. A loss with the Honiton bank, which
share of this enormous amount of loss, or it was left

we put down,

160,000 HAMMERSLEY'S BANK. as an incubus on the bank to be liquidated by the ac 3. A loss in the soap factory,

80,000 cruing profits of that establishment, we do not know. The following account of Messrs Hammersley and The latter seems the more probable, seeing that the

L.260,000 their bank (Pall Mall, London), which lately stopped firm was gradually stripped of every one of its mempayment, is given in the Circular to Bankers. The bers, except the lamented Mr Hugh Hammersley.

We believe that, under the management of the late manner in which Mr T. Hammersley is described to Whilst the firm was subject to the aforesaid influ. Mr Hugh Hammersley, this large sum was in the have been led on from one

speculation to another.. ence-viz., was under the direction principally of its course of graduał liquidation from regularly accruing which preceded it, but always making matters worse considerable magnitude were incurred, either by that scription

of business had been attracted to the office, gives a startling insight into the higher walks of busi- gentleman individually, or by the house over which he and we believe if the disaster had occurred a few ness in this commercial country.

presided. There was one with an office-bearer in his years sooner, the creditors would have received a “Some fifty or sixty years ago, the old and eminent Majesty's Treasury, amounting to a sum approaching smaller dividend—the assets boing, now stated to be banking-house of Herries and Co. was the only firm to L..40,000. What portion of this sum may have been cqual to the payment of about 15s.

in the pound. The in England which had adopted the practice of issuing subsequently liquidated by the connexions of the

party rapid sliding away of property from opening the notes payable on presentation, or at a few days' sight, on whom the obligation rested, we do not know. Then shuice of improvident confidence, and the slow recoat various large towns throughout the continent there was a much larger sum which Mr Thomas Ham- very of it by care and circumspection--for a quarter Europe : it was a circulation of the greatest possible mersley advanced to a firm for the manufacture of of a century has elapsed since any of the losses herc convenience, safety, and utility to travellers and tem- soap carried on in the borough of Southwark. The stated were incurred are notable

facts, worthy of the porary residents in foreign countries, and it was very loss here, we believe, was little, if any thing, short of consideration of all bankers and merchants.” properly, and with much foresight as to the conse- L.80,000. The history of this soap manufacture would quences, so arranged by the introducers of the prac- be interesting and instructive if related circumstantice as to render the accommodation to the applicants tially in detail; we must episodically advert to some

MILITARY SYSTEM OF FRANCE. or the public easy and economical to them, so that of the leading facts, for they are pregnant with warn.

[The following condensed and accurate account of the military they always felt obliged for the opportunity of resort ing to men of property and such as have the command svätom of France is extracted from the second part of Mesars ing to it. It was also, no doubt, a lucrative kind of of large sums of money.

,

from the works of Malte Brun and Balbi; a work evidently prebusiness to the issuers of the notes. The amount of An ingenious person of the name of Phelps, pro- pared with extraordinary care and with the benefit of an unusuthis circulation must have been greatly curtailed by fossed the art of making soap of a better quality than ally extensive command of information, and which, when com, the French revolutionary war; but still it was almost any other manufacturer of the article could produce. ploted, as designed, in one volume,

must be the most economical an exclusive field, and it had, as may fairly be assumed, The profession was not a vain one, no regard being

book of the kind which we possess.) rendered a good return to the enterprising firm with had to the cost, as the product exhibited bore evidence. The French have always been fond of military glory, whom the practico originated. The war must termi- On this showing, he induced men of great property to and have invariably placed the most unhesitating connate; and those who were in possession of the field of join him with capital, without careful examination ; fidence in their prowess in war. Their arms have, inoperation, and were acquainted with all the circum- costly works were raised, and the best plant was formed deed, at various times been crowned with the most stances, places, persons, and details necessary to the that labour, materials, and money could furnish. They splendid success, and yet no nation has ever experienced conduct and management of such a business, would soon found, however, that profit did not ensue from greater reverses or more signal defeats. At present, the have great advantages on the renewal of intercourse this large outlay, and Mr Phelps then suggested that French governinent maintains a large standing army, with the continent of Europe. Few persons knew the great profit lay in the making of alkali

, and the rated, even on the peace establishment, at 311,412 men, any thing about the extent of the profits of this kind firm consequently undertook the manufacture of that and 62,142 horses. This force is composed of infantry, of banking business ; but among those few would be article ; still there was no profit, and the adventure cava'sy, artillery, and engineers. The infantry consist of the confidential clerks of Messrs Herries, and one of had at this stage absorbed too much money to admit 67 regiments of infantry of the line of three battalions them was the late Mr Thomas Hammersley, the father of the consideration of 'retreat from the enterprise. each ; 21 regiments of light infantry, also of three batof Mr Hugh Hammersley, just deceased.

“Go ahead' was then the signal-flag of the times; talions each; 3 battalions of light infantry of Africa ;. Mr Hainmersley quitted his position as clerk, and so the firm turned merchants, and would 'fetch their 8 companies de discipline ; 4 companies of pioneers; 3 entered into co-partnership with Messrs Morland and tallow in their own ships from St Petersburg. It was battalions of_zuaves; and a foreign legion of three Ransom, under the firm of Morland, Ransom, and during the war; the tallow-laden ships were seized, battalions. The cuvalry consist of 2 regiments of caraHainmersley. This firm did not remain united many and carried into one of the Danish islands. This was bineers; 10 regiments of cuirassiers ; 12 regiments of years, and it was understood on its dissolution that a great blow to the firm; and to recover their property dragoons ; 8 of lancers; 12 of chasseurs ; 6 of hussars ;there was a balance of loss to be borne by each of the they mustered a sufficient force to go and atteinpt to 3 of chasseurs d'Afrique ; ) regiment of regular spahis. several parties. It might not be a very large one, at cut out and retake the ship or ships, and in this they of Algiers; 1 regiment of Bonal; 1 regiment of Oran. least not amounting to a sum that could materially im- succeeded. One large ship was on its passage home from The artillery consist of 14 regiments of twelve batteries pede the operations of a great and substantial London the Danish port, with a cargo insured for more than each; 1 battalion of pontoniers, 12 companies of artilbanking firm ; but supposing it to be not more than L.40,000, when the captain and crew descried a smaller lery workmen; and 6 squadrons of train of the parks L.20,000 for Mr Hammersley's share, it was to that vessel, to which they gave chase, with thie intention of of artillery, each including six companies. The engiextent a load on that gentleman's shoulders in his capturing it; but which, when they came near to it, neers consist of 3 regiments of sixteen companies each, subsequent struggles. He then, upwards of thirty, they found to be an American, with whose country we and various other bodies. The total number of infantry, years ago, formed a co-partnership under the firm of were at peace, and they dared not touch it. They in 1839, was 205,100; of cavalry, 49,000; of artillery, Hammersleys, Montelieu, Greenwood, Brooksbank, and then steered for London, but the ship and cargo were 22,700, of engineers, &c., 28,506 ; besides 28,500 genDrewe-a union which would seem to promise great burnt before they reached port, the crew alone escap- darmes, or armed police, dispersed in small bodies results in profit, seeing that Mr Greenwood was in the ing; and the underwriters refused to pay one shilling, throughout the kingdom. The was establishment is high tide of prosperity as the leading army-agent and because the ship had been out of the prescribed rated at 420,265 men, and 121,892 horses. The army the confidential friend of the Horse Guards, and that course in chase of the American. In this, and such is recruited pariiy by voluntary enlistaneut, and partly other members of the firm were capable by their con other ways as great manufactures on novel plans are by conscription; but the iatter is greatly modified since nexions of introducing valuable business to the new ineident to, several hundred thousand pounds were the time of the Emperor Napoleon; the numbers rebanking-office.

lost by Messrs Phelps and Co. It happened, however, that the new firm was under

quired being now limited to 40,000 annually, and the

We continue the recital, Mr Phelps“ succeeded in period of service to six years, while great latitude is: the principal direction of a mind deeply imbued with getting for his co-partner Mr Bracebridge, proprietor allowed in the procuring of substitutes. the bold and confident spirit of the times--a spirit of Aston Hall, near Birmingham, the park and fine which is in perfect contrast to that which governs | old mansion of which estate is now in the occupation lieutenant, captain, chef d'escadron, colonel, marechal

Tho gradations of military rank are, sub-lieutenant,

room:

de camp, lieutenant-general, and marechal of France.

ADVISERS.

quite quiet for three years and seven months, she may Promotion is never obtained by purchase, and not often

get up quite a genteel figure. Jemima and Lucy are by special order; more than half the appointments take The following specimen of the shrewd humour of James rather better figures: I hope to have them up and about place by seniority. The number of marechals of France Smith was intended to have been included in a notice of in a twelvemonth.” “ Poor girls, don't they find it very is at present ten ; but hy the new regulations it is to be his “ Memoirs and Coinic Miscellanies," which lately ap. dull ?" " Oh no ; I left them this morning with • Irvings fixed at eight in time of peace, and may be increased peared in the Journal, but was postponed for want of Four Orations," and " Southey's History of the Brazils.

Plenty of amusement, that's my maxim. Let me advise to twelve in time of war. Not content with military glory by land, the French commenced its residence in Upper Harley Street. It There is a family named Partington, that has lately you, as a friend, to follow my example.”

Mrs Chambers was qualified to give all this advice have been equally ambitious to become a great naval consists of a father, a mother, two sons, and two daugh- from living in Lower Grosvenor Street, which gave her power, but have not hitherto succeeded in rendering ters. The father is a sturdy, red-faced, good sort of much more knowledge of the world (especially on a fine themselves formidable by sea. After a century and a man, and the mother is a slender, sallow, good sort of Sunday) than could be possessed by an inhabitant of half of continual effort and frequent conflict, their fleet woman. John, the elder son, is with his father in the Upper Harley Street. Mrs Partington, for the same reawas almost annihilated by the battle of Trafalgar, and wine and spirit line, in America Square ; Charles, the son, was bound to take it in seeming thankfulness. Most subsequent minor engagements during the late war. younger son, is in the law; the two girls expect to be fortunate was it for the two Misses Partington, that their Since the peace, the government have paid the utmost married. There is at present a great deal of adrice mainma was " advised as a friend." But for those soul. attention to the navy, and are now prepared, in the stirring about London, and the Partingtons have given revolting expressions, Mrs Partington might have been event of war, to send a powerful fleet to sea. Accord

and received more than their due proportion of it. It induced to call in Doctor Level to bind her daughters' ing to the budget of 1839, there were in active service, I has often astonished me why so much of that commodity back-bones over to their good behaviour ; and the two

Misses Partington, in lieu of cantering under the back8 ships of the line, 12 frigates, 16 corvettes or sloops, for it ; indeed, nine people out of ten tell you, in pretty wall of Marlborough House, and kicking up as much 24 brigs, and numerous other vessels; and the amount plain terms, to keep your advice to yourself - yet still we dust as a couple of countesses, might, at this present of their crews was 20,317 men. The number in com

continue to give it.' Never was benevolence more gra- writing, have been flat on their backs, in the back drawmission at 1st January 1840, was Ships of the line, tuitous than ours !

ing-room in Upper Harley Street, like a couple of 13, from 80 to 120 guns; frigates, 13; corvettes, 19; Hardly was old Partington well settled in Upper Har- Patiences on a monument, smiling at a whitewashed brigs, 33 ; gunbrigs, ; schooners, cutters, advice-boats, ley Street, in a most commodious situation, inasmuch as ceiling! transports, &c., 578; steam vessels, 25. By royal or it commanded a corner view of the outside of the Diodonnance of 1st January 1837, the navy in time of peace rama, with a peep at the little statue of the late Duke

LINES TO MURPHY. is fixed at 40 ships of the line, 50 frigates, 40 steamers, of Kent at the top of Portland Place—when he received and 190 smaller vessels. The smaller vessels are to be a visit from his crony, Mr Chapman, of Devonshire

[The following lines, which first appeared some months sinca kept afloat; but only half of the ships of the line and Square, Bishopsgate Street, who called to give him some

in a periodical work of limited circulation, are obligingly placed frigates are intended to be launched, the other half to advice as to his recent proceedings.

at our disposal by the author-the same individual who composed

Mr Chapman commenced his harangue in one of the be kept on the stocks in different stages of building.

“ Tonis ad resto Mare."] accustomed forms : “ Now, Mr Partington, I am sure you As soon as a young man has been apprenticed in the have too much good sense to be offended at what I'm

Oh, Murphy, Murphy, I am s.re afraid coasting trade, or has made two voyages at sea, or has about to say.” Mr Partington assured him, in answer,

You're but a poor and sorry cominon-tator; been employed two years in the fisheries, he is registered that he had a great deal too much good sense; where

A very tyro in the weather trade,

And all unfit for Jack Frost's legislator. in the lists of the district to which he belongs. Besides upon the adviser, in reply, began to descant upon the this class of mariners, all other persons, be their ages

Your foggy days, alas! are clear and fine, extreme folly of Mr Partington in quitting his city resi

Your cold and rainy all are warm and sunny: what they may, who enter merchant vessels, or engage dence to sojourn in Upper Harley Street. The adviser

Each following day belies your every line. in the fisheries, are inscribed in the registers as soon reminded the advisee of those happy days when, Bedlam

And proves your want of science and of money. as they have seen service; nor is any exception made being then standing upon London Wall, they used to

What ails your hail that it will not come down? in their favour, though they may have previously stood walk up and down Moorfields in front of the iron gates of

Why does your Phæbus fib us, too, like this? their chance of the ballot for the army, or have served that edifice, for half an hour before dinner, to get an

Why does your thunder disappoint the town, their time in its ranks. The record of their names in appetite ; a needless ceremony, but persisted in not with

In your ephemeral Ephemeris? the register of mariners is all that is necessary to fix that such had been their practice; but alleged in his standing. Mr Partington owned, with downcast eyes,

Your meteorologic logic pray rovise, that liability upon them; and in their case, as well as defence, that nobody lived in the city at present—"even

Your problems too, so very problematic; in that of every regularly bred seaman, this liability Bedlam has deserted it," exclaimed he, with a sigh.

And if, moon-struck, you still must theorise,

Let not your comet course be so erratic. continues till the age of fifty. They all become as much " True," answered the adviser, " and if you had removed the property of the state as the Russian serf is of the your quarters to St George's Fields, I should not have so

Your reign will end before the rain begins,

And down to Zero sink your reputation ; landowner at the moment of his birth. Whenever much wondered ; but what the deuce could draw you to

Fog, Meteor, Vapour, all will kick your shins, sailors are required for the naval service, the naval Upper Harley Street ? Let me now advise you as a

And change your altitude to declination. prefect announces to the local supervisor or commis- friend : if you have not yet signed and sealed, declare off,

The powers above-Aries, et celero, sary the quota of men to be supplied from each district. and come back again. We have dined with you once, in

Libra, Aquarius, Sagittarius-all The latter thereupon directs the syndic of the navy to the way of friendship; but, my dear Jonathan, when you Will be indignant at thy exposé, send him twice or thrice the number of men required, hundred yards of the Royal Exchange, what could put

And stop, methinks, thy Comic Annual. and he makes such selections from them as he thinks it into your head to drag us four miles off, to cut your

The planets, too, will doubtless join the wars, proper. No exemption whatever is admitted ; and there mutton in Marybono parish ?". Mr Chapman now re

Stop thy diurnal, annual rotation ; is no appeal from the will or caprice of the commissary tired, and Mr Partington took his adviee as children take

And, thy Urania mania marred by Mars,

Thou wilt not well escape a good gyration. The total number of individuals, of all descriptions, em- physio, by canting it out of the window the moment the ployed in the sea service, as at 1st January 1838, was | apothecary's back is turned. The lease was executed

But fare you well, my weather.beaten boy; 110,589, among whom there were 10,836 captains, ship that very morning, and Mr Partington, notwithstanding

I'll bid good-bye, with every wish that's kind:

May all your future days be fine and dry, • masters and pilots; and of that number 272 belonged a strong internal aversion to the hot chalky dusty corner

And you still make a brecze and raise the wind. to the public, and 6946 to the mercantile service. of the Portland-road, became tenant of the house in

As connected principally, though not exclusively, with Upper Harley Street for twenty-one years, from Christthe army and navy, we may mention the Order of the mas-day then last past. Men in the spirit line are not to

RECOVERY OF PROPERTY. Legion of Honour, which was instituted by Napoleon. be advised with impunity,

The following circumstance is as true as it is singu. The usual title to admission is the discharge of impor apartment behind the dining-room the only one in the lar. A few years ago two gentlemen, who had been left tant duties, either civil or military;

and in time of war; whole house which a married man can call his own, and executors to the will of a friend, on examining the prothe performance of some action of great bravery. The gradations are—). Chevaliers, of whom the number is even this is apt to be invaded by hats, canes, and um- perty, found a scrap of paper on which was written,

“Seven Hundred Pounds in Till.” This they took in unlimited ; 2. Officers, limited by the laws of the order brellas, out of number), advice was going on at a great

rate in the front drawing-room up stairs. Mrs Chambers the literal sense, and examined all his apartments careto 2000; 3. Commanders, limited to 400; Grand-Offi.

was full tilt at Mrs Partington, advising her how to fully, but in vain. They sold his collection of books to cers, to 160; and Grand-Crosses, to 80; but on 1st manage her family. “My dear Mem (for to this dimi a bookseller, and paid the legacies in proportion. The January 1840, the actual number of the members was nutive is our French Madame humbled since the Revo- singularity of the circumstance occasioned them fre-Grand-Crosses, 96 ; Grand-Officers, 206 ; Command lution)--my dear Mem,” said this matronly Mentor, quently to converse about it, and they recollected among ers, 829; Officers, 1491 ; Chevaliers, 44,393; in all, only conceive that you should never have heard of the books sold (which had taken place upwards of seven 50,015.

Doctor Level. I've got three of my girls down under his weeks before), there was a folio edition of Tillotson's
hands, and I hope to get Julia down the moment she
comes from school." “ Down! Mrs Chambers, I don't

Sermons. The probability of this being wliat was
PUBLIC HEALTH AND MORTALITY.

quite understand you." “ No !-only conceive how odd! alluded to by the word " Till” on the piece of paper, Paradoxical as it may appear, it is certain that a By down, I mean down flat upon their backs upon three made one of them immediately wait upon the bookseller man's health, nay life, is nearly as much in the keeping sofas. Doctor Level says it's the only way to bring up who had purchased the books, and ask him if he had of those of whom he knows nothing as in his own. Of

girls straight. All depends upon the spine : nerves, bile, the edition of Tillotson, which had been among the the three influences mainly acting on it—himself, springs from the spine.” “Well !-but, Mrs Chambers, and the volumes being handed down, the gentleman

toothache, asthma, and every thing of that kind-all books sold to him. On his replying in the affirmative, society, and external nature-the first bears on it most is not horse exerciso a better thing? My girls ride in immediately purchased them, and on carefully examining «intensely, the second most covertly, the last most con St James's Park now and then, with their brother the leaves, found bank notes, singly dispersed in various stantly. Moral culture may teach the individual so to Charles as a make-weight. I can assure you, several places of the volumes, to the amount of seven hundred curb his passions and appetites, as to develop all the young men of very considerable property ride there; 1 pounds! But what is perhaps no less remarkable than forces of his organisation in their most healthful scope; and, according to my calculation, men are more apt to or its neglect may set them loose as the deadliest in- fall in love on horseback than on foot." " Horseback !

the preceding, the bookseller informed him that a genstruments of self-destruction. The social system acts only conceive how dreadful! Doctor Level won't hear tleman at Cambridge, reading in his catalogue of this upon us not only through its fashions and customs, but of it: he says girls should be kept quiet-quite quiet. edition to be sold, had written to him, and desired it by the power of government; and an ill-considered im- Now, you know Anna is short and rather thick in her might be sent to Cambridge, which was accordingly post, indirectly affecting the food, the habitation, or the figure: the poor girl burst into tears on reading that done ; but the books not answering the gentleman's ex. clothing of the community, shall send more to their spair about her: only conceive !--no more figure than the bookseller's shop till the period of this very singular

Lord Byron bated a dumpy woman. I was quite in de pectations, they had been returned, and had been in graves than ever fell by sword or spear. Climate is always so ameliorated by civilisation, that we may safely. It's no matter, she must have the long gaiters.'" “ Long

my thumb! I spoke to Dr Level about it, and he said, discovery.--Odd Fellow. say that it forms no exception to the general fact, that gaiters, Mrs Chambers !-- a very pretty appurtenance to all the sources enumerated as influencing life are a grenadier, but surely for a diminutive young lady" Dean Swift says, the common fluency of speech, greatly modifiable; so that, although we may not be Oh, Mem, I beg your pardon : it's the best thing in the most men and most women, is owing to a scarcity of lieve, with M. Quetelet, in the perfectibility of our race, world ; let me advise you, as a friend, to try the long matter and scarcity of words ; for whoever is a master we may yet be sure that all its numerous ills may be gaiters. *. I'll venture to say, that in six years he would of language, and hath a mind full of ideas, will be apt, immeasurably lessened. Nothing is truer than that make little Crachami as long as the Queen of the Sand-in speaking, to hesitate upon the choice of both; the mortality of a kingdom is the best gauge of its wich Islands. How he manages it I don't know, but whereas common speakers have only one set of ideas, happiness and prosperity. Show us a community wal. there are two long straps that keep down the shoulders and one set of words to clothe them in, and these are lowing in vice, whether from the pamperings of luxury under the sofa, which sets the straps in motion, and pulls of church

when it is almost empty, than when a crowd and flatten the ankles; then he turns a sort of screw; always ready at the mouth; so people come faster out or the recklessness of poverty, and we will show you out the body just for all the world as if he were rolling is at the door. that there truly the wages of sin are death, Point out the government legislating only for a financial return, Mem, would you believe it? we have already gained two

out paste for a gooseberry pie-crust. Well, my dear regardless or ignorant of the indirect effects of their | inches; and Doctor Level promises me, if I keep Anna LONDON: Published, with permission of the proprietors, by W.8. enactments, and we shall see that the pieces of silver

ORR, Paternoster Row; and sold by all booksellers and news have been the price of blood.--Quarterly Revier.

* Qu. Elongators ?

men.-Printed by Bradbury and Evans, Whitefriars.

8. W. P.

FLUENCY OF SPEECH.

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CONDUCTED BY WILLIAM AND ROBERT CHAMBERS, EDITORS OF “ CHAMBERS'S INFORMATION FOR THE PEOPLE,”

“ CHAMBERS'S EDUCATIONAL COURSE," &c.

NUMBER 461.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1840.

PRICE THREE HalfPENCE.

THE NORE AND THEREABOUTS.

A FEW WEEKS FROM HOME. half so genteel as spending it for a few weeks on the character of the coast. About three miles to the amusements of Margate ?

eastward, on the verge of the sea, stand those re

With these preliminary explanations, we now land, markable objects of antiquity, and land-marks, the To continue these rambling sketches of home travel, in the first place, on that part of the coast where the towers of the church of Reculver. To this spot the reader may be reminded that we stopped in our real and more sober-minded rusticators resort. Herne | I hastened to pay a visit. In front is the wide journey through Hampshire, to spend a quiet Sunday Bay, as this place has been called, is quite of modern expanse of the German Ocean, studded here and amidst the interesting antiquities of Winchester and date; and its name, as may be inferred, is derived from there with vessels making for the mouth of the St Cross. Departing from this scene of William of the ancient village of Herne, which is situated about Thames from the Downs or continental ports ; on our Wykeham's glories, and now one of the least altered a mile inland, on the high road to Canterbury.* The left is the Isle of Sheppy, darkly pictured on the of Old England's oldest cities—leaving the green and coast at this spot is eminently suited for a watering- horizon, and on the right that flat expanse of prairie soft luxuriance of the vale of the Itchin, we proceed place. Unlike the greater part of the adjacent dis- or meadow land, which occupies the filled-up channel on our way by rail to London, and in little more than trict, the shore has a fine slope, in the form of a sandy between the mainland and Thanet, whose higher two hours we are turned out from the mixed train to and pebbly beach, to the water, and may at all times be grounds close up the scene. Nowhere, on the be mixed among the busy crowds of the metropolis. reached from steamers with perfect comfort, by means coast of Great Britain, have such extensive changes

Some writers—my Lady Morgan for one, if we of a beautiful and substantial jetty of three quarters been effected by the sea and other causos, on the recollect rightly–have a very convenient knack of of a mile in length. The country, backwards, all the dimen ons and configuration of the land. On a provaulting at a bound over an interval of time in their way to Canterbury, is of a soft undulating character, minent knoll

, now carried completely away by the narratives, by giving a dashing line of stars—the said well plenished with woods and copses, and dotted over waves of the ocean, once stood the castle of Raculfstars being all that the reader gets for some darkly with old-fashioned hamlets and trimly thatched farm-cester, an early station of the Romans, and, latterly, mysterious part of the story which it would puzzle the buildings and cottages. The walks, therefore, whether a seat of the Anglo-Saxon king, Ethelbert. During author to explain. On the present occasion it would along the grassy downs which overhang the sea, or into this latter period, a church of great extent was built be remarkably easy to follow this excellent example, the rural scenery beyond, seem well adapted for the adjoining the castle ; and it is the towers of this but as plain dealing is more to our taste, we shall just summer solacement of the overworn inhabitants of edifice, popularly called the Reculvers, which now say, in a few words, that we pass over an interval of the city. Some ten or twelve years ago, Herne Bay, stand as the most prominent objects on the whole line three months, and are again, during the fortnight or by the activity of a few rash speculators, became “all of coast. On attaining the spot, we find that the sea three weeks of “farewell summer,” once more upon the rage,” and buildings and streets, on a superlatively has washed away at least a mile of the land, leaving our rambles from home. In short, we are again in grand scale, sprung up in all directions. From one for several miles a precipitous cliff, which is daily London, ready for all sorts of inquiries and excursions. cause or other, however, the tide of popularity did not lessening in bulk. In dread of these rapid encroach

I had gone, I do not know how often, up and down last a sufficient length of time, and the building lots ments, the church has been many years abandoned, the Thames. Sheerness, and Tilbury Fort, and Pur- being retained at enormous prices, the projected town and is now an open desolated ruin—the only complete fleet, and Gravesend, and the old cocked hats and stuck after it had been begun, and in the present day portion remaining being the two towers, which are wooden legs which daily air themselves on the terrace we find it composed of many partially finished edi- preserved as land-marks for mariners: The sea has at Greenwich, were all perfectly familiar to me. But fices, and rows of streets standing like so many loop-not, as is generally reported, reached the building, somehow or other I had never got round the Nore, in holed and ragged ruins. Nevertheless, the place, as but it has carried away a half of the burying-ground the direction of Margate ; and so now I resolved to Brown would have said, has capabilities calculated to around it, and numerous remains of mortality project pay a brief visit to a few places in this quarter of the carry it over this great initiatory misfortune, and from the face of the cliff, and are scattered along the Kentish coast.

these are leading gradually to its settlement and im- beach. To prevent, if possible, farther inroads, the The opportunities for making such an excursion are provement.

Trinity House has caused the erection of a paved now exceedingly plentiful. In the days of old, the Along the shore there is a remarkably neat terrace- bulwark for a considerable distance along the shore ; only means of transit consisted of the Margate hoys, like walk for promenaders. Adjacent are bathing and it is evident, that unless some precautionary meaa class of small sloops which carried you in a couple houses, numerous dwellings for visiters, and two hotels sures of this kind be speedily adopted elsewhere, a of days, wind and weather permitting, to the place of of large dimensions in full operation ; during my very considerable loss of land must ensue. The exyour destination ; but now, what a change !-smart short stay, a very handsome church was consecrated traordinary carelessness kicnerto shown on this point, steamers dash off daily from London Bridge, and in by the archbishop for the use of the inhabitants, is far from creditable. At present, as we are told by five or six hours disload their hundreds of gaily-dressed regular and transient. It would be very inexcusable Mr Lyell, the loss of land, by the washing away of passengers on the jetties of Herne Bay and Margate. to pass over in this notice, however slight it be, the the clayey and chalky cliffs, is at least two feet per In one of the most active of these well-managed boats, good deeds done to the town by a benevolent and annum; and it is calculated that the whole island of the Red Rover, we one morning placed ourselves ; wealthy patroness, Mrs Thwaites, relict of an opulent Sheppy, now measuring six miles in length by four and in due time were brought abreast of the Isle of merchant in the city, and who devotes no small share in breadth, will be annihilated in half a century. Sheppy and adjacent parts in the mainland of Kent. of her property to charitable and public purposes. It is interesting, in a geological point of view, to This part of the coast, it is necessary to explain, forms Unlike the generality of mankind, who only leave remark, that while the precipitous and some other the great airing ground of the good folk of the me- wealth to their fellow-creatures when they can no parts of the coast have been diminishing annually, tropolis. During “ the season” as many as two or longer make use of it themselves, this well-disposed land has in one spot been accumulating with equal three thousand persons are daily landed and carried lady, having taken a fancy to Herne Bay, has largely rapidity. Casting our eye south-eastwards from the back to town. But Saturday, in particular, forms the assisted in the support of free schools for the place, Reculvers, as I have said, we observe a flat tract of great day for these excursions ; the toiled and stupe- and lent her charitable aid to the poor of the neigh- rich meadow land, as like the polders of Holland as fied tradesman, who has been stewed up for a week bourhood. She likewise, a few years ago, erected, at any thing in this country. This tract, which is emamidst the streets and lanes of the city, on that day a considerable expense, a tall and handsome clock- bellished with trees, fences, and farm-offices, was once gets off to pay his accustomed visit to his wife and tower on the sea-promenade, which may be seen at a an arm of the sea, which stretched from Sandwich to family—to enjoy a few hours' fresh air on the beach on great distance. Although totally unacquainted with near the Reculvers, and through this navigable chanSunday—and to return again on Monday to his desk this lady, there seems such a degree of rationality in nel the Roman fleets used to sail on their way to and and dingy counting-house.

the disposal of her superabundant wealth, that I feel from the Thames. About the time of the Norman From all I could learn, there are two kinds of sum- much pleasure in holding up her conduct to imitation. Conquest, the Channel became impassable, from the mer recreation in these places of resort_one consist- Herne Bay forms a good starting-point for those accumulation of earthy matter; and in the fifteenth ing of actual rustication and airing at Herne Bay or who wish to explore the antiquities and geological century it was crossed by a bridge. Since that period, Ramsgate, and another of imaginary rustication and

all vestige of water course has disappeared, if we except airing among the fashionable lounges and tea-gardens bishop of Rochester and London; and here he resided for several

* Herne was the first cure of the pious Ridley, afterwards

the wet ditches which here and there intersect the of Margate. Another thing may be mentioned; the years, discharging the duties of his pastoral office with great

enclosed fields. It will be understood, therefore, that resort to cither of these places is almost exclusively zeal.—Beauties of England and Wales, vol. viii. Herne church, to

Thanet is no longer an island, but a portion of the of persons east of Charing Cross—that is to say, citi- which I paid a visit, contains a number of objects as old as the mainland of Kent, and forms a bold piece of country, zens with their wives and families, or young ladies fifteenth century; among others, is a monumental brass figure with the North Foreland, Margate, and Ramsgate, on and gentlemen of the same class, who wish to spend Lord Mayor of London ; she died in 1470, and is represented in

over the tomb of Lady Phelip, wife of Matthew Phelip, sometime its exterior and sea-washed extremity. money any way, but“ genteely,” if possible ; and what the dress of the times

Having sufficiently explored the environs of Herne

room:

de camp, lieutenant-general, and marechal of France.

ADVISERS.

quite quiet for three years and seven months, she may Promotion is never obtained by purchase, and not often

get up quite a genteel figure. Jemima and Lucy are by special order; more than half the appointments take Tux following specimen of the shrewd humour of James rather better figures : I hope to have them up and about

“ Poor girls, don't they find it very place by seniority. The number of marechals of France Smith was intended to have been included in a notice of in a twelvemonth." is at present ten; but by the new regulations it is to be his " Memoirs and Coinic Miscellanies," which lately ap. dull ?” “Oh no ; I left them this

morning with • Irvings fixed at eight in time of peace, and may be increased peared in the Journal, but was postponed for want of Four Orations, and Southey's History of the Brazils.

Plenty of amusement, that's my maxim. Let me advise to twelve in time of war.

a have been equally ambitious to become a great daval consists of a father, a mother, two sons, and two daugh- from living in Lower Grosvenor Street, which gave her Not content with military glory by land, the French commenced its residence in Upper Harley Street. It / You, as a friend, to follow my example."

Mrs Chambers was qualified to give all this advice power, but have not hitherto succeeded in rendering ters. The father is a sturdy, red-faced, good sort of much more knowledge of the world (especially on a fine themselves formidable by sea. After a century and å man, and the mother is a slender, sallow, good sort of Sunday) than could be possessed by an inhabitant of half of continual effort and frequent conflict, their fleet woman. John, the elder son, is with his father in the Upper Harley Street. Mrs Partington, for the same reawas almost annihilated by the battle of Trafalgar, and wine and spirit line, in America Square ; Charles, the son, was bound to take it in seeming thankfulness. Most subsequent minor engagements during the late war. younger son, is in the law; the two girls expect to be fortunate was it for the two Misses Partington, that their Since the peace, the government have paid the utmost married. There is at present a great deal of advice maima was " advised as a friend.” But for those soulattention to the navy, and are now prepared, in the stirring about London, and the Partingtons have given revolting expressions, Mrs Partington might have been event of war, to send a powerful fleet to sea. Accord- and received more than their due proportion of it. It induced to call in Doctor Level to bind her daughters' ing to the budget of 1839, there were in active service, has been, and continues to be, given : nobody thanks you Misses Partington, in lieu of cantering under the back

has often astonished me why so much of that commodity back-bones over to their good behaviour, and the two 8 ships of the line, 12 frigates, 16 corvettes or sloops, for it ; indeed, nine people out of ten tell you, in pretty wall of Marlborough House, and kicking up as much 24 brigs, and numerous other vessels; and the amount plain terms, to keep your advice to yourself—yet still we dust as a couple of countesses, might, at this present of their crews was 20,317 men. The number in com

continue to give it.' Never was benevolence more gra- writing, have been flat on their backs, in the back draw. mission at 1st January 1840, was-Ships of the line, tuitous than ours !

ing-room in Upper Harley Street, like a couple of 13, from 80 to 120 guns; frigates, 13; corvettes, 19; Hardly was old Partington well settled in Upper Har- Patiences on a monument, smiling at a whitewashed brigs, 33 ; gunbrigs, g; schooners, cutters, advice-boats, ley Street, in a most commodious situation, inasmuch as ceiling! transports, &c., 578; steam vessels, 25. By royal or- it commanded a corner view of the outside of the Diodonnance of 1st January 1837, the navy in time of peace rama, with a peep at the little statue of the late Duke

LINES TO MURPHY. is fixed at 40 ships of the line, 50 frigates, 40 steamers, of Kent at the top of Portland

Place—when he received and 190 smaller vessels. The smaller vessels are to be a visit from his crony, Mr Chapman, of Devonshire

[The following lines, which first appeared some months sinca kept afloat; but only half of the ships of the line and Square, Bishopsgate Street, who called to give him some in a periodical work of limited circulation, are obligingly placed frigates are intended to be launched, the other half to advice

as to his recent proceedings.

at our disposal by the author-the same individual who composed be kept on the stocks in different stages of building.

Mr Chapman commenced his harangue in one of the

“ Tonis ad resto Mare."] accustomed forms: “ Now, Mr Partington, I am sure you As soon as a young man has been apprenticed in the have too much good sense to be offended at what I'em

Oh, Murphy, Murphy, I am s.re afraid coasting trade, or has made two voyages at sea, or has about to say." Mr Partington assured him, in answer,

You're but a poor and sorry common-tator ; been employed two years in the fisheries, he is registered that he had a great deal too much good sense; where

A very tyro in the weather trade,

And all unfit for Jack Frost's legislator. in the lists of the district to which he belongs. Besides upon the adviser, in reply, began to descant upon the this class of mariners, all other persons, be their ages extreme folly of Mr Partington in quitting his city resi

Your foggy days, alas! are clear and fine,

Your cold and rainy all are warni and sunny; what they may, who enter merchant vessels, or engage dence to sojourn in Upper Harley Street. The adviser Each following day belies your every line, in the fisheries, are inscribed in the registers as soon reminded the advisee of those happy days when, Bedlam

And proves your want of science and of money. as they have seen service; nor is any exception made being then standing upon London Wall, they used to

What ails your hail that it will not come down? in their favour, though they may have previously stood walk up and down Moorfields in front of the iron gates of

Why does your Phæbus fib us, too, like this? their chance of the ballot for the army, or have served that edifice, for half an hour before dinner, to get an

Why does your thunder disappoint the town, their time in its ranks. The record of their names in appetite ; a needless ceremony, but persisted in not with

In your ephemeral Ephemeris? the register of mariners is all that is necessary to fix that such had been their practice; but alleged in his standing. Mr Partington owned, with downcast eyes,

Your meteorologic logie pray rovise, that liability upon them; and in their case, as well as defence, that nobody lived in the city at present—"even

Your problems too, so very problematic; in that of every regularly bred seaman, this liability Bedlam' has deserted it," exclaimed he, with a sigh.

And if, moon-struck, you still must theorise, continues till the age of fifty. They all become as much “True," answered the adviser, “ and if you had removed

Let not your comet course be so erratic. the property of the state as the Russian serf is of the your quarters to St George's Fields, I should not have so

Your reign will end before the rain begins,

And down to Zero sink your reputation; landowner at the moment of his birth. Whenever much wondered ; but what the deuce could draw you to

Fog, Meteor, Vapour, all will kick your shins, sailors are required for the naval service, the naval Upper Harley Street ? Let me now advise you as a

And change your altitude to declination. prefect announces to the local supervisor or commis- friend : if you have not yet signed and sealed, declare off

,

The powers above-Aries, et celero, sary the quota of men to be supplied from each district. and come back again. We have dined with you once, in

Libra, Aquarius, Sagittarius-all The latter thereupon directs the syndic of the navy to the way of friendship; but, my dear Jonathan, when you Will be indignant at thy exposé, - send him twice or thrice the number of men required, could have us all to dinner in a ring-fence, within one

And stop, methinks, thy Comic Annual. and he makes such selections from them as he thinks hundred yards of the Royal Exchange, what could put

The planets, too, will doubtless join the wars, proper. No exemption whatever is admitted ; and there it into your head to drag us four

miles off, to cut your

Stop thy diurnal, annual rotation ; is no appeal from the will or caprice of the commissary. tired, and Mr Partington took luis adviee as children take mutton in Marybone parish ?". Mr Chapman now re

And, thy Urania mania marred by Mars, The total number of individuals, of all descriptions, em- physio, by canting it out of the window the moment the

Thou wilt not well escape a good gyration. ployed in the sea service, as at 1st January 1838, was apothecary's back is turned. The lease was executed

But fare you well, my weather-beaten boy: 110,589, among whom there were 10,836 captains, ship- that very morning, and Mr Partington, notwithstanding

I'll bid good-bye, with cvery wish that's kind :

May all your future days be fine and dry, masters and pilots; and of that number 272 belonged a strong internal aversion to the hot chalky dusty corner

And you still make a brecze and raise the wind. to the public, and 6946 to the mercantile service. of the Portland-road, became tenant of the house in

8. W. P. As connected principally, though not exclusively, with Upper Harley Street for twenty-one years, from Christthe army and navy, we may mention the Order of the mas-day then last past. Men in the spirit line are not to

RECOVERY OF PROPERTY. Legion of Honour, which was instituted by Napoleon. be advised with impunity,

The following circumstance is as true as it is singu. The usual title to admission is the discharge of impor- apartment behind the dining-room (the only one in the lar. A few years ago two gentlemen, who had been left tant duties, either civil or military;

and in time of war, whole house which a married man can call his own, and executors to the will of a friend, on examining the prothe performanee of some action of great bravery. The gradations are-1. Chevaliers, of whom the number is brellas, out of number), advice was going on at a great even this is apt to be invaded by hats, canes, and um- perty, found a scrap of paper on which was written,

“Seven Hundred Pounds in Till.” This they teok in unlimited ; 2. Officers, limited by the laws of the order rate in the front drawing-room up stairs. Mrs Chambers the literal sense, and examined all his apartments careto 2000; 3. Commanders, limited to 400; Grand-Officers, to 160; and Grand-Crosses, to 80; but on lst manage her family. “My dear Mem (for to this dimi

was full tilt at Mrs Partington, advising her how to fully, but in vain. They sold his collection of books to January 1846, the actual number of the members was nutive is our French Madame humbled since the Revo- singularity of the circumstance occasioned them fre

a bookseller, and paid the legacies in proportion. The -Grand-Crosses, 96 ; Grand-Officers, 206; Command lution)--my dear Mem,” said this matronly Mentor, quently to converse about it, and they recollected among ers, 829; Officers, 4491; Chevaliers, 44,393; in all, only conceive that you should never have heard of the books sold (which had taken place upwards of seven 50,015.

Doctor Level. I've got three of my girls down under his weeks before), there was a folio edition of Tillotson's hands, and I hope to get Julia down the moment she Sermons. The probability of this being what was

comes from school.” “Down ! Mrs Chambers, I don't PUBLIC HEALTH AND MORTALITY.

quite understand you." “ No !-only conceive how oddi alluded to by the word " Till” on the piece of paper, Paradoxical as it may appear, it is certain that a By down, I mean down flat upon their backs upon three made one of them immediately wait upon the bookseller man's health, nay life, is nearly as much in the keeping girls straight. All depends upon the spine? nerves, bile, the edition of Tillotson, which had been among

the sofas. Doctor Level says it's the only way to bring up who had purchased the books, and ask him if he had of those of whom he knows nothing as in his own. Of toothache, asthma, and every thing of that kind-all books sold to him. On his replying in the affirmative, the three influences mainly acting on it-himself, springs from the spine.” “Well !—but, Mrs Chambers, and the volumes being handed down, the gentleman society, and external nature--the first bears on it most is not horse exerciso a better thing? My girls ride in immediately purchased them, and on carefully examining intensely, the second most covertly, the last most con- St James's Park now and then, with their brother the leaves, found bank notes, singly dispersed in various stantly." "Moral culture may teach the individual so to Charles as a make-weight. I can assure you, several places of the volumes, to the amount of seven hundred curb his passions and appetites, as to develop all the young men of very considerable property ride there ; pounds! But what is perhaps no less remarkable than forces of his organisation in their most healthful scope; and, according to my calculation; men are more apt to the preceding, the bookseller informed him that a genor its neglect may set them loose as the deadliest in- fall in love on horseback than on foot." Horseback

btleman at Cambridge, reading in his catalogue of this upon us not only through its fashions and customs, but of it: he says girls should be kept quiet-quite quiet. edition to be sold, had written to him, and desired it by the power of government; and an ill-considered im- Now, you know Anna is short and rather thick in her might be sent to Cambridge, which was accordingly post, indirectly affecting the food, the habitation, or the figure: the poor girl burst into tears on reading that done ; but the books not answering the gentleman's ex. clothing of the community, shall send more to their spair about her: only conceive !--no more figure than the bookseller's shop till the period of this very singular

I was quite in de pectations, they had been returned, and had been in graves than ever fell by sword or spear. Climate is my thumb! I spoke to Dr Level about it, and he said, discovery.-Odd Fellow. always so ameliorated by civilisation, that we may safely . It's no matter, she must have the long gaiters.'" “ Long say that it forms no exception to the general fact, that gaiters, Mrs Chambers !-a very pretty appurtenance to all the sources enumerated as influencing life are a grenadier, but surely for a diminutive young lady"

Dean Swift says, the common fluency of speech, in greatly modifiable ; so that, although we may not be- "Oh, Mem, I beg your pardon: it's the best thing in the most men and most women, is owing to a scarcity of lieve, with M. Quetelet, in the perfectibility of our race, world; let me advise you, as a friend, to try the long matter and scarcity of words; for whoever is a master we may yet be sure that all its numerous ills may be gaiters.* l'il venture to say, that in six years he would of language, and hath a mind full of ideas, will be apt, immeasurably lessened. Nothing is truer than that make little Crachami as long as the Queen of the Sand- in speaking, to hesitate upon the choice of both; the mortality of a kingdom is the best gauge of its wich Islands. How he manages it I don't know, but whereas common speakers have only one set of ideas, happiness and prosperity. Show us a community wal. there are two long straps that

keep down the shoulders and one set of words to clothe then in, and these are lowing in vice, whether from the pamperings of luxury and flatten the ankles, then he turns a sort of screw; always ready at the

mouth; so people come faster out the sofain and or the recklessness of poverty, and we will show you out the body just for all the world as if he were rolling / of church when it is almost empty, than when a crowd the government legislating only for a financial return, Mem, would you believe it? we have already gained two regardless or ignorant of the indirect effects of their inches; and Doctor Level promises me, if I keep Anna London: Published, with permission of the proprietors, by W.8. enactments, and we shall see that the pieces of silver

ORR, Paternoster Row; and sold by all booksellers and nonhave been the price of blood.-Quarterly Revier.

* Qu. Elongators ?

mon.-Printed by Bradbury and Evans, Whitefriars.

FLUENCY OF SPEECH,

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