The idyllia, epigrams, and fragments, of Theocritus, Bion, and Moschus, with the elegies of Tyrtæus, tr. into Engl. verse, to which are added, dissertations and notes, by R. Polwhele, Band 1

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Seite 73 - The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fading together ; and a little child shall lead them.
Seite 205 - For there is hope of a tree if it be cut down, that it will sprout again, and that the tender branch thereof will not cease. Though the root thereof wax old in the earth, and the stock thereof die in the ground, yet through the scent of water it will bud and bring forth boughs like a plant.
Seite 165 - Set me as a seal upon thine heart, as a seal upon thine arm : for love is strong as death ; jealousy is cruel as the grave : the coals thereof are coals of fire, which hath a most vehement flame...
Seite 63 - And it came to pass at noon, that Elijah mocked them, and said, Cry aloud: for he is a god; either he is talking, or he is pursuing, or he is in a journey, or peradventure he sleepeth, and must be awaked.
Seite 143 - That our garners may be full and plenteous with all manner of store ; that our sheep may bring forth thousands, and ten thousands in our streets ; 14 That our oxen may be strong to labour ; that there be no decay, no leading into captivity, and no complaining in our streets.
Seite 197 - I will rise now, and go about the city In the streets, and in the broad ways I will seek him whom my soul loveth : I sought him, but I found him not. The watchmen that go about the city found me : To whom I said, Saw ye him whom my soul loveth?
Seite 162 - And when the Philistine looked about, and saw David, he disdained him; for he was but a youth, and ruddy, and of a fair countenance.
Seite 151 - Here sacred pomp and genial feast delight, And solemn dance and hymeneal rite ; Along the street the new-made brides are led, With torches flaming, to the nuptial bed ; The youthful dancers in a circle bound To the soft flute and cithern's silver sound ; Through the fair streets the matrons in a row Stand in their porches and enjoy the show.
Seite 141 - Can the Ethiopian change his fkin, or the " leopard his fpots ? then may ye alfo do good, that
Seite 137 - That this stream, at certain seasons of the year, especially about the feast of Adonis, is of a bloody colour; which the heathens looked upon as proceeding from a kind of sympathy in the river for the death of Adonis, who was killed by a wild boar in the mountains, out of which this stream rises.

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