The Speeches of Richard Lalor Sheil

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Thomas MacNevin
J. Dutty, 1865 - 471 Seiten
 

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Seite 40 - God, give us grace that we may cast away the works of darkness, and put upon us the armour of light, now in the time of this mortal life, in which thy son Jesus Christ came to visit us in great humility ; that in the last day, when he shall come again in his glorious Majesty to judge both the quick and dead, we may rise to the life immortal...
Seite 418 - That there is satisfactory evidence, that many, professing to be original witnesses of the Christian miracles, passed their lives in labours, dangers, and sufferings, voluntarily undergone in attestation of the accounts which they delivered, and solely in consequence of their belief of those accounts ; and that they also submitted, from the same motives, to new rules of conduct.
Seite 292 - They rose in dark and evil days To right their native land; They kindled here a living blaze That nothing shall withstand. Alas! that Might can vanquish Right — They fell and passed away; But true men, like you, men, Are plenty here to-day. Then here's their memory — may it be For us a guiding light, To cheer our strife for liberty, And teach us to unite. Through good and ill, be Ireland's still, Though sad as theirs your fate; And true men be you, men, Like those of Ninety-Eight!
Seite 168 - Strafford, while he trampled upon our rights, and trod upon the heart of the country, protested hia solicitude to do justice to Ireland. What marvel is it, then, that gentlemen opposite should deal in such vehement protestations? There is, however, one man, of great abilities, not a member of this house, but whose talents and whose boldness have placed him in the topmost place in his party — who, disdaining all imposture, and thinking it the best course to appeal directly to the religious and national...
Seite 291 - Who fears to speak of Ninety-eight ? Who blushes at the name ? When cowards mock the patriot's fate, Who hangs his head for shame ? He's all a knave, or half a slave, Who slights his country thus ; But a true man, like you, man, Will fill your glass with us.
Seite 168 - The Duke of Wellington is not a man of an excitable temperament. His mind is of a cast too martial to be easily moved ; but notwithstanding his habitual inflexibility, I cannot help thinking that when he heard his Roman Catholic countrymen (for we are his countrymen) designated by a phrase as offensive as the abundant vocabulary of his eloquent confederate could supply...
Seite 223 - A MILK-WHITE Hind, immortal and unchanged, Fed on the lawns and in the forest ranged ; Without unspotted, innocent within, She feared no danger, for she knew no sin.
Seite 89 - It was a common practice with them to go in parties about the country, swearing many to be true to them, and forcing them to join by menaces, which they very often carried into execution.
Seite 252 - And the people said unto Saul, Shall Jonathan die. who hath wrought this great salvation in Israel ? God forbid : as the LORD liveth, there shall not one hair of his head fall to the ground ; for he hath wrought with God this day. So the people rescued Jonathan, that he died not.
Seite 347 - False, — I repeat it, with all the vehemence of indignant asseveration, — utterly false is the charge habitually preferred against the religion which Englishmen have laden with penalties and have marked with degradation. I can bear with any other charge but this; to any other charge I can listen with endurance. Tell me that I prostrate myself before a sculptured marble; tell me that to a...

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