The Pursuit of Knowledge Under Difficulties: Illustrated by Anecdotes, Band 2

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C. Knight, 1831 - 427 Seiten
 

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Seite 80 - New Experiments Physico-mechanical, touching the spring of the air, and its effects ; (made for the most part in a new pneumatical engine) written .... by the honourable Robert Boyle, Esq* experiment xxxvi.
Seite 297 - An admirable and most forcible way to drive up water by fire, not by drawing or sucking it upwards, for that must be as the philosopher calleth it, infra spheeram activitatis, which is but at such a distance. But this way hath no bounder, if the vessels be strong enough ; for I have taken a piece of a whole cannon, whereof the end was burst, and filled it three...
Seite 320 - It can engrave a seal, and crush masses of obdurate metal like wax, before it, — draw out, without breaking, a thread as fine as gossamer, and lift a ship of war like a bauble in the air. It can embroider muslin, and forge anchors, — cut steel into ribands, and impel loaded vessels against the fury of the winds and waves.
Seite 324 - ... verbiage of the dull books he perused, or the idle talk to which he listened ; but to have at once extracted, by a kind of intellectual alchemy, all that was worthy of attention, and to have reduced it for his own use, to its true value and to its simplest form. And thus it often happened that a great deal more was learned from his brief and vigorous account of the theories and arguments of tedious writers, than an ordinary student could ever have derived from the most...
Seite 384 - Before I had learnt from the note the name and business of my visitor, I was struck with the manliness of his person, the breadth of his chest, the openness of his countenance, and the inquietude of his eye.
Seite 346 - Now you will not assert, gentlemen, said I, that it is more difficult to construct a machine that shall weave than one which shall make all the variety of moves which are required in that complicated game.
Seite 157 - I mention it only, as it shows the solicitude and extreme activity which he had about every thing that related to his art; that he wished to have his objects embodied as it were, and distinctly before him; that he neglected nothing which could keep his faculties in exercise, and derived hints from every sort of combination.
Seite 404 - X.— A PRELIMINARY DISCOURSE ON THE OBJECTS. ADVANTAGES. AND PLEASURES OF THE STUDY OF NATURAL PHILOSOPHY. In 1 Vol. By FJW HERSCHEL, Esq.
Seite 157 - If, in his walks, he found a character that he liked, and whose attendance was to be obtained, he ordered him to his house : and from the fields he brought into his painting-room, stumps of trees, weeds, and animals of various kinds ; and designed them, not from memory, but immediately from the objects. He even framed a kind of model of landscapes on his table ; composed of broken stones, dried herbs, and pieces of looking-glass, which he magnified and improved into rocks, trees, and water. How far...
Seite 29 - Muscovy ; he was, indeed, resolved to encourage learning and to polish his people by sending some of them to travel in other countries, and to draw strangers to come and live among them.

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