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It is but justice to say, that a number of these Journals are conducted with eminent ability, and much distinguished by the virtues of truth, honour, patriotism, and philanthropy. But a very large number of them are weak and worthless; most of the former, as well as the latter, are stern opposers of true Christianity, while they nevertheless are nearly all the sworn friends of the Established Church, in defence of which they stand ever ready to wield their strongest and their weakest, their best and their worst weapons. They are, therefore, of course, not only unanimous, but hot in their hostility to the great principles of Nonconformity.

Liberal.

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Liverpool Journal
Liverpool Mercury
Liverpool Times

Liverpool Weekly News
Macclesfield Chronicle
Manchester Advertiser
Manchester Examiner
Manchester Express
Manchester Guardian
Manchester Times
Newcastle Advertiser
Newcastle Chronicle
Newcastle Guardian
Monmouthshire Merlin
Northampton Mercury
Norwich Mercury
Norfolk News
Nottingham Mercury.
Nottingham Review
Oxford Chronicle
Plymouth Journal
Hampshire Telegraph
Preston Chronicle
Preston Guardian
Reading Mercury
Rochester Gazette

Sheffield Independent

Sheffield Iris

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Warwick Advertiser
Westonian Mercury
Whitehaven Herald

Windsor and Eton Express
Worcestershire Chronicle
Worcester Herald

York Courant
Yorkshireman
York Herald

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There is much reason to rejoice in this mighty array of intellectual power and intelligence, notwithstanding the large alloy of feebleness and ignorance, so widely and so equally diffused throughout this great nation, and in the main so earnestly and so honestly set for the defence of the Liberties of England, and the advocacy of regulated freedom throughout the earth. Were there no world but the present, one might survey this mingled host of lettered and untutored men with all but unmixed complacency; as matters stand, however, with relation to eternity, it is far otherwise! Even this Liberal Press is, to an awful extent, pervaded by the spirit of Infidelity. The vast bulk of it does little for morals, less for religion, and nothing at all for religious freedom. On this last point, setting aside the Bucks Advertiser, Bradford Observer, Brighton Guardian,

Bristol Gazette, Cambridge Independent Press, Cheltenham Free Press, Falmouth Packet, Hull Advertiser, Ipswich Express, Leeds Mercury, Leeds Times, Leicester Chronicle, Leicester Mercury, Manchester Examiner, Manchester Express, Newcastle Guardian, Norfolk News, Nottingham Review, Sheffield Independ. ent, with one or two more, all of which have strong claims to the gratitude of the English patriot and the Christian philanthropist, the vast remainder may be characterized as "of the earth, earthy.' But notwithstanding the fact that the quiet spirit of Infidelity is the genius that presides over this mighty system, when matters, at any time, in any place, come to the push, Church! Church! Church! is the inscription of every ensign! Yes, whether Christians or not, all are hearty Churchmen, and fierce antagonists of the Voluntary System!

39

The question, then, is, What, under these circumstances, ought to be done? We submit, first, that all the Journals above excepted ought to receive the general, uniform, and strenuous support of all classes of Dissenters, in their several localities. They are not all, indeed, up to the full mark; but even the hindmost are far advanced, and have strong claims on gratitude and confidence; and what can more tend to accelerate their progress than a prompt yielding of the support which is due to their merits? Dissenters have drawn too long and too largely on the bounty of their literary advocates. This is injustice; it is folly. There is a limit to the sacrifice of property by men who must keep a conscience, and of talents by those whose abilities are their only patrimony, the sole means of their subsistence. That the advocacy of their principles may become adequate to the occasion, they have only to meet the advocates with a just, not to say a generous recompense. "He that hath friends must show himself friendly."-But, secondly, it is needful to adopt measures for multiplying Nonconformist Presses throughout England by establishing them in every great centre where they do not now exist; and to this end we require at least some fifty more Journal establishments. With proper management, as to pecuniary matters, this might soon be satisfactorily adjusted: the difficulty respects Editorial Agency, and here haphazard and chance medley must give place to provident arrangement and elaborate system. Reflecting men will see in a moment that if specific and thorough

training be, as a rule, absolutely necessary for the Pulpit Instructors of the Nation, and even for those who are to conduct its Common Schools, it must, to say the least, be equally necessary_for the Press Instructors of this Great Empire. But the fact is notorious, that a large portion of the Regiment Editorial, of all parties, have received not only no special training, but no training whatever beyond a common education. It is not thus with that portion of the Press which is already in the hands of the Roman Catholics! The time has come when Nonconformists must turn their best attention to this matter, and concentrate upon the Press of the land an adequate portion of the first talent of their community, and that talent cultivated to the utmost possible extent. But knowledge, genius, general culture, how high soever, is not enough. There must be tact, skill, special training. To this end there is wanted in London a Normal School for Editors; and to furnish this we require a Journal Establishment issuing a Daily, a Thrice-a-week, and a Weekly Paper, with a consolidated Editorship of five or six general scholars, Christian patriots, political philosophers, and first-rate Public Writers; with a staff of some fifteen or twenty gifted, devout, and thoroughlydisciplined Young Men, in the capacity of Pupil Editors, to be regularly admitted and articled for three years, and the numbers to be kept up as they are successively drafted off to take charge of Journals in Great Britain and the Colonies. The Committee of the Patriot and Banner Proprietary are quite competent to nurse up their Establishment to this grand consummation.

IS "THE BRITISH BANNER" THE JOURNAL OF ALL?

Horton College, Bradford, Yorkshire, · Nov. 5th, 1847. MY DEAR DR. CAMPBELL,-I am much gratified to see you making the attempt which you describe in your Prospectus of the BANNER. I should be very happy to aid in getting you your 100,000; and I have (as part Editor of the Magazine, which circulates most widely already amongst the Baptists, and for which our ministers have engaged to do wonders next year) the means of doing so.

My power to do it must, however, depend on the clearness with which I can state that the controversy between us and Pædobaptists will be denied admittance to the BANNER.

Of course, there is no earthly objection to your getting up a paper for Independents. I only wish, if that be not your design, to be able to show it broadly. In the latter case, if you be so kind as to send me straightforward answers to

the following questions, not later than the 12th inst., I shall be glad to help you to the uttermost in our December number, and still more in January, when we expect a very large circulation. I am myself au out aud-out Open Communicant, but I want to know how far I can push your Paper without offence. I am, dear Sir, Yours, very sincerely, F. CLOWES.

Dr. Campbell.

1. Will the BANNER admit discussions of the Baptismal, or any other sectarian controversy ?

2. So far as Religious Intelligence is admitted, will the Baptists stand on the same footing as the Pædobaptists ?

3. Will the Strict Baptists be exposed to any censures on account of their peculiar views?

4. As the Paper comes forth under the sanction of the Congregational Union, is it designed to advance the general interests of Pædobaptist Congregationalists chiefly; or will the sanction of other Congregational bodies of Christians be also sought, and their interests equally attended to?

London, Nov. 8th, 1847. MY DEAR SIR,-I am not a little gratified by your frank, friendly, and explicit communication,-which I shall now answer, in terms not less explicit than its own. As to question

of character, of any orthodox denomination, are alike eligible.

1. The BANNER "will not admit discussions of the Baptismal, or any other sectarian controversy," nor a word that could prompt them. By referring to the Prospectus, you will find it distinctly stated that "the BANNER will be the Journal of all classes of Nonconformists, but the ORGAN of none," p. 12. It will strenuously endeavour to unite the entire Nonconformity of the Empire, and will know absolutely nothing of sects or parties, except as Churchmen and Dissenters-Voluntaries and Compulsories: so that Presbyterian Dissenters, Methodist Dissenters, yea, and Episcopalian Dissenters, will meet on common ground, and stand in the columns of the BANNER on a perfect equality.

2. Not only will the "Religious Intelligence" of the Baptists be admitted, but that of all other communities;-only, by the term "Intelligence" must be understood matters really important to the kingdom of Christ; for there is much that ranks under the head of "Intelligence" which appears, and, to some extent, properly appears, in the Denominational Journals, consisting of local trifles and religious gossip, which can have no place in the columns of the BANNER, which, as much as may be, must be charged only with matters interesting to all.

3. Here I somewhat boggle. I may say, however, that our brethren will not be exposed to "censures;" though it is not wholly impossible that they may, once in twelve months, come in for a friendly hint, or a fraternal remonstrance, on the ground of their exclusiveness. I have, however, no doubt that they and I will, as heretofore, go on very well together.

4. From your remarks here, I perceive that when you wrote you had not been able to read the Prospectus, from which you would have learned that the Congregational Union has no more to do with the matter than the Free Church Assembly has: that the creating power is lodged in the Patriot Newspaper Committee, which is a mixed body of Christian gentlemen of Nonconformist principles-a body to which Dissenters,

VOL. IV.

Thus, then, my dear Sir, you will see that the thing is entirely according to your own notions of catholicity and comprehensiveness, or rather, I presume, it goes much beyond them, as it not only provides for perfect equality between Baptists and Pædobaptists, but amongst all classes of Nonconformity, whatever be their form of ecclesiastical polity.

Much pleased by the cordial interest you take in my enterprise, and with best thanks for your promised aid, I remain,

Your obliged friend and brother, Rev. F. Clowes. J. CAMPBELL.

ON LENDING NEWSPAPERS-REPEAL OF THE PENAL STATUTE.

IN reference to a recommendation contained on the wrapper of our last Number to individuals to take in and lend THE BRITISH BANNER to read, at a penny an hour, an intelligent Correspondent writes to express a fear that to do so would be illegal, and expose the lender to a penalty of £5 Such was the case eleven years back; but the law has been repealed, and it is now perfectly legal. The laws respecting Newspapers are the following:

By 29 Geo. III, cap. 50, sect. 9, no hawker of newspapers, or other person, shall let out any newspaper for hire to any person, or to different persons, or from house to house, on pain of forfeiting £5, to be recovered and applied as other penalties relating to the stamp duties.

By 6 and 7 William IV., cap. 76, sect. 32, (1836,) so much of the 29th Geo. III., cap. 50, as in any manner related to newspapers, or the duties thereon, respectively, is repealed.

As to the postage of newspapers, 6 and 7 William IV., cap. 54, sect. 17, provides that any Paper to be sent out of the kingdom must be posted within seven days after publication.

PROVIDENT SOCIETIES.

THE progress of Provident Institutions, espe. cially amongst religious classes, must be welcomed by every well-wisher to those around him. Religion will best make its way upon the heart, and develop itself in the life, when its influences are not impeded by oppressive worldly anxiety, for no device of the great adversary is more successful in preventing or destroying serious impressions than undue solicitude concerning the affairs of life.

Yet provision is essential-As life advances, so do its obligations; the honourable discharge of which in times like the present, requires no ordinary efforts.-Is there, then, no way by which the future can be provided for, and the liabilities of advancing infirmity and age can be met, without detriment to the influences of religion upon the heart? Provident Institutions are an answer to the inquiry.

As a general observation it may be affirmed that every one has a season allotted to him during which he may acquire means enough for 2 P

the discharge of personal and relative obligations, with also a reserve beyond.

Upon the right use of this reserve future experience much depends.

Hazard and speculation, by depressing the more exalted faculties, cherish insensibility and inaptitude for religion; while provident habits will prove an effectual check upon mental disquietude and worldly engrossment. It is, however, within the reach of few so to employ this reserve as to make adequate provision for sickness, old age, and death. This is true, but here again, the Provident Institution solves the difficulty. The magnitude of its operations and the unity of its relations, enables a society to do for individuals collectively, what separately and unassociated they could never do for themselves. It amasses large accumulations by judiciously investing the large deposits of its members; these accumulations it distributes proportionably among the members, giving, by the conjoint operation of an associated body, a much larger benefit than such could, in the ordinary way, obtain alone. Hence the large advantages which are constantly being advertised as resulting from mutual life assurance. The particulars could be given of a policy of £3,000 being maintained by so small an annual premium as £16, and of another where £2,000 remains secured to a widow without any annual payment at all!

Precisely in proportion to the importance of Provident Institutions is the necessity of establishing them upon correct and well-authenticated data. If the Society be at fault here, it must eventually become, to some of its members, the very reverse of the name it bears.

Instead of affording all the members the due reward of their provident habits, by sustaining them in the hour of calamity, those only who are earliest afflicted will derive benefit, while the remainder will find the Society bankrupt at the time of their need. Instead of preserving ample funds, it is discovered that gradual exhaustion has been going on. A case could be named of a minister, who has belonged to three Societies in succession: one after the other has broken up-and now, being 69 years old, it is very unlikely that he can be admitted a member of any other institution. Can anything be more unsatisfactory ?-Happily, however, such things need not be. The path to safety and success is as discernible here as in other objects. Truth points it out, and will reward a faithful observance of its directions.

There are two obvious requirements in a Provident Institution;-1. That it promise no nore than it can fulfil. 2. That it provide what is really required by the members,-a So

ciety disregarding these requirements will ultimately prove a failure. If a member be asked what are his expectations in joining a Provident Society, he will probably reply, "Ten shillings a week in sickness whenever I am ill." But if the sum he pays is not sufficient to provide the ten shillings-or if the Rules contemplate a shorter duration of sickness than the statistics of the country show that he may experience-clearly his anticipations will be disappointed. Herein is the secret of the failures which are constantly taking place:-More is promised than can be performed-or less is given than is really required. This, too, is the evil which modern investigation proclaims as pertaining to the great mass of existing societies. A Society could be named, the affairs of which were recently examined; and, notwithstanding £1,000 was the sum in hand, no less than £15 was required from each member to make the Society solvent-of course it broke up. Others could be named in similar circumstances.

REV. JAMES PARSONS.

FEW cities occupy so distinguished a place as York in the history of our country. Under the Saxons, the Danes, and the Romans, it was alike an object of attention, both in war and peace. To this hour there is, to the ear of an

These remarks may serve again to call attention to the Christian Mutual Provident Society, which has been established under the sanction of the Congregational Union, expressly to counteract the evils of ordinary institutions, and to afford the Christian public the means of becoming allied to a firm and extensive Society. It comprises numerous branches, and has enrolled several hundred members. Its rates have been calculated according to the ascertained laws of sickness and mortality-while the benefits which it confers are larger than in any other Society. Its especial design is to secure to members the very important advantage of full-pay in sickness for a longer period than most Societies contemplate. Hence, in protracted sickness, members, instead of being periodically reduced to quarter-pay, just as their necessities become greatest, are sustained by a higher rate of benefits. To many members, protracted sickness is certain,-how important, then, for them to be connected with a Society that can sustain them throughout!

It may not be unimportant to notice, that the late lamented Mr. Ely, of Leeds, took a deep interest in this Society. Discerning its bearing upon the happiness and comfort of individual members of churches and congregations, he welcomed it as a benefit to the community at large.

Shortly before his death he had established a branch at Leeds, and had commended the Society to his surrounding ministerial brethren. Although the Society can no longer enjoy the benefit of his influence, it is no small encouragement to its conductors that such a man approved it.

Autumnal Meeting of the Union.

Englishman, a strength and dignity of historic association in the simple wordYork! But its dignity depends not wholly on its antiquity; its warlike glory has given place to the better glories of peace, humanity, philanthropy, and religion. But the Capital has now been lost

in the County: the political watchword is now no longer York, but-Yorkshire! York, however, as a city, is still famous on other and higher grounds,—grounds relating to Nonconformity and the alleloquent ministration of Christian truth. While Yorkshire had its Wilberforce, York has its Parsons. Although still in the full vigour of his days, Mr. Parsons has now laboured in that city during the long period of twenty-six years, in which he has caused its name to be read by more eyes and uttered by more lips than the name of any other city, in connection with that of any other man of his time and country. The mission of Mr. Parsons is as peculiar as his ministration. He has been not merely the pastor of a large church; he has been the preacher of a great nation. There is no city or town, and scarcely a village of any magnitude, where his voice has not been heard: all denominations of Nonconformists have shared his ceaseless and mighty labours, the benefits of which have also, indirectly, abundantly redounded to the Established Church. It would be not a little interesting to look on a map of his travels during these twenty-six eventful years. As a preacher of righteousness Mr. Parsons has made a decisive experiment on his age and country-an experiment of truthful oratory on general nature; and the result is most instructive. His popularity has suffered no decline; if his discourse has somewhat abated in brilliancy and passion, it has greatly increased in weight and ripeness; and hence, if it is less intoxicating to the young, it is more grateful to the old. Never was it so adapted as now to meet the average necessities of a Christian assembly. If more proof

were wanted of the solid worth of his ministry, it is found in the fact that it is not less prized in Scotland than in England. It was supposed that the fire and splendour of his speech would not be suited to the cold light and hard strength of the frozen North. There is reason to believe that the great preacher himself was of this opinion, and that hence, for four-and-twenty years he resisted all importunities to cross the border. At length, however, he ventured, and like another Cæsar, in that land of logic, he came― he saw-he conquered! An able critic in the Glasgow Examiner thus records the triumph:

Parsons had just finished one of his brilliant illustrations in a beautiful and stately climax.

"A short account of this extraordinary preacher will show the justness of the inference thus abruptly and tersely expressed. Fancy a person rather above the middle size, and proportionably broad-squarely and coarsely built -shoulders high, and neck short-forehead low, and face round-eyes small and twinklingcheeks full, and mouth large, and features generally inexpressive-and you have a tolerably accurate idea of the personal appearance of the man on whose lips raptured thousands in York weekly hang. One ignorant of his fame, who' for the first time, sees him in the pulpit, has no very exalted idea of the preacher as he sits, with his head drooping on his breast, and concealed with his right hand, without a muscle moving, save the rapid twinkle of his eye. The more daring may hope that from that robust frame sounds harsh and hollow may proceed, and that perchance indications of life may appear in these still features, by the effort of thundering declamation, or the loud and long reiteration of theological common-places; but not one man in a thousand, not a man on earth, has penetration to discover the character of the mind that lodges in that dull dwelling. As he rises and begins to speak, hopelessness in the audience gives place to perplexity. A form such as the one before them is generally furnished with stentorian lungs, but the voice that proceeds is gentle and soft, almost inaudible. The enunciation is graceful, and the feminine voice steals gently through the breathless audience. At length the text is announced, and after diligent search it is found. Like an anxious scholar, who now looks at his text-book, and now at his teacher, the preacher now looks intently at his noteless Bible, and then suddenly glances at the front of the gallery. Having finished a simple and apt introduction, chiefly composed of passages of Scripture, he announces, in terse phrase and logical order, but with the manner and air as outre as ever, the beautiful outline of his discourse. The small voice begins to swell, the small eye begins to sparkle, the left hand is buried in the Bible, and the right is occasionally lifted up. The Shortly the statue is instinct with life. honest countenance reflects a heavenly radiance; and the audience that a little ago alternated between hopelessness and perplexity, is thrilled to the very core, as thoughts that breathe, couched in words that burn, are scattered in rich profusion. The first illustration being finished, and the audience having partially recovered from the electric shock of ethereal genius, feels that a freak of nature-but a

"There is mind in York,' muttered a thin, thoughtful-looking man in the crowded gallery of one of our city churches, last sabbath, as

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