The history of modern Europe: With an account of the decline and fall of the Roman empire: and a view of the progress of society, from the rise of the modern kingdoms to the peace of Paris, in 1763, Band 1

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Printed for William Young Birch and Abraham Small, by H. Maxwell, Columbia-house., 1802
 

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The emperor notwithstanding this service persists in
37
He dies after dividing his dominions between his two sons
44
They apply to the Romans but without effect and ulti
45
The seven kingdoms of the Heptarchy formed in
51
The absurdities of the ordeal ibid
57
A O Pge
62
Having settled the government of Italy he marches against
63
Assists at the council of Frankfort
69
He associates his son Lewis with him in the empire ibid
75
His three srlns by the first bed among whom he had
78
Is defeated and obliged to receive conditions ibid
84
87 These Northern ravagers besiege Paris ibid
87
The emperor Lewis II dies without male heirs
91
Britain from the time it was Relinquished by the Romans
95
98 Charles III surnamed the Simple son of Lewis the Stam
98
Throws off that disguise
101
LETTER XIII
109
The Normans establish themselves in France
114
Conquers Lorrain ibid
120
Leaves only a shadow of royalty to his son Lothario ibid
123
Otho enters Italy a third time and quells anew revolt
130
Increases in prosperity to the hour of his death ibid
137
Succeeded by his son Edward the Martyr ibid
147
A b Page
148
Dies before his return ibid
157
Page
160
Harold obtains the crown of England on the death of
166
Singular manners and customs
176
Pag
181
The African Governors shake off their dependence on
182
a o Page
189
nerous passion for the softer sex saves Europe from
203
Henry composes the disorders there and is crowned
206
J073 Hildebrand elected Pope under the name of Gregory
212
Overwhelmed with enemies in consequence of the dis
216
Dies in the twelfth year of his reign and is succeeded
275
She marries Henry Plantagenet duke of Normandy
281
Extensive continental dominions of Henry IL
287
Henry II sends ambassadors to Rome to maintain
300
Philip Augustus succeeds to the crown of France
306
Pag
314
Conquers Poland and erects it into a tributary kingdom
323
His kingdom is laid under an interdict by the Pope
334
Privileges secured by that Charter ibid
341
A Pag
347
He encourages a new crusade
353
The Pope absolves king John from the oath which he
363
Loses what remained to him of Poitou
368
Make themselves masters of Nice and Antioch and break
374
The king restored
376
His son Philip surnamed the Hardy saves the remains
385
Ferdinand III king of Castile conquers Cordova
391
Edward revives a claim of feudal superiority over that
405
Obtains large supplies from his parliament and confirms
411
The English forces driven out of Scotland
418
The Scots ravage the northern counties of England
425
Edward concludes a truce with Scotland ibid
428
Establishes the grandeur of his family in Austria ibid
435
He resolves to establish the Imperial authority in Italy
441
War between France and England 330
444
Fails in that enterprize and dies at Perpignan
447
Philip IV succeeded by his son Lewis X
454
Philip III at the instigation of the Pope undertakes
456
The English gain an important advantage over the French
465
Calais taken by Edward
471
Is flattered in his pretensions by Robert of Artois ibid
477
John unable to fulfil the articles of the treaty honourably
479
Lewis lands near the city or Damietta in Egypt at
484
Clovis king of the Franks son of Childeric and grandson
486

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Seite 291 - He summoned an assembly of all the prelates of England; and he put to them this concise and decisive question, Whether or not they were willing to submit to the ancient laws and customs of the kingdom ? The bishops unanimously replied, that they were willing, saving their own order...
Seite 109 - THE merit of this prince, both in private and public life, may, with advantage, be set in opposition to that of any monarch or citizen, which the annals of any age or any nation can present to us. He seems, indeed, to be the complete model of that perfect character, which, under the denomination...
Seite 264 - This change happening precisely at the juncture when the panic terror, which I have mentioned, rendered pilgrimages most frequent, filled Europe with alarm and indignation. Every person who returned from Palestine related the dangers which he had encountered in visiting the holy city, and described with exaggeration the cruelty and vexations of the Turks.
Seite 242 - ... was a general survey of all the lands in the kingdom, their extent in each district, their proprietors, tenures, value; the quantity of meadow, pasture, wood, and arable land, which they contained; and in some counties the number of tenants, cottagers, and slaves of all denominations, who lived upon them.
Seite 298 - Some menacing expressions which they had dropped gave a suspicion of their design ; and the king dispatched a messenger after them, charging them to attempt nothing against the person of the primate ; but these orders arrived too late to prevent their fatal purpose. The four assassins, though they took different roads to England, arrived nearly about the same time at Saltwood, near Canterbury; and, being there joined by some assistants, they proceeded in great haste to the archiepiscopal palace.
Seite 333 - ... the images, the statues of the saints were laid on the ground ; and, as if the air itself were profaned, and might pollute them by its contact, the priests carefully covered them up, even from their own approach and veneration. The use of bells entirely ceased in all the churches : the bells themselves were removed from the steeples, and laid on the ground with the other sacred utensils.
Seite 266 - These men took the road towards Constantinople, through Hungary and Bulgaria ; and trusting that Heaven, by supernatural assistance, would supply all their necessities, they made no provision 'for subsistence on their march.
Seite 334 - ... and as if the air itself were profaned, and might pollute them by its contact, the priests carefully covered them up, even from their own approach and veneration. The use of bells entirely ceased in all the churches, the bells themselves were removed from the steeples and laid on the ground with the other sacred utensils. Mass was celebrated with shut doors, and none but the priests were admitted to that holy institution.
Seite 407 - For this reason he issued writs to the sheriffs, enjoining them to send to parliament, along with two knights of the shire, two deputies from each borough within their county...

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