Man of Two Lives: A Narrative Written by Himself

Cover
Wells, 1829 - 324 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 213 - The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together : our virtues would be proud if our faults whipped them not; and our crimes would despair if they were not cherished by our virtues.
Seite 115 - Come, pensive nun, devout and pure, Sober, steadfast, and demure, All in a robe of darkest grain. Flowing with majestic train, And sable stole of Cyprus lawn Over thy decent shoulders drawn. Come, but keep thy wonted state, With even step, and musing gait, And looks commercing with the skies9 Thy rapt soul sitting in thine eyes...
Seite 74 - IT was a dismal, and a fearful night, Scarce could the Morn drive on th' unwilling Light, When Sleep, Death's image, left my troubled breast By something liker Death possest. My eyes with tears did uncommanded flow, And on my soul hung the dull weight Of some intolerable fate. What bell was that? Ah me ! too much I know ! My sweet companion, and my gentle peer, Why hast thou left me thus unkindly here, Thy end for ever, and my life to moan ? O thou hast left me all alone ! Thy soul and body, when...
Seite 13 - would it had been done ! Thou didst prevent me ; I had peopled else This isle with Calibans. Pro. Abhorred slave ! Which any print of goodness will not take, Being capable of all ill ! I pitied thee, Took pains to make thee speak, taught thee each hour One thing or other : when thou didst not, savage, Know thine own meaning, but would'st gabble like A thing most brutish, I endow'd thy purposes With words that made them known...
Seite 179 - I hesitate, from the apprehension of ridicule, when I approach the delicate subject of my e,arly love. By this word I do not mean the polite attention, the gallantry, without hope or design, which has originated in the spirit of chivalry, and is interwoven with the texture of French manners.
Seite 106 - From doubts unfetter'd, and dissolved in day ; Unwarm'd by vanity, unreach'd by strife, And all my hopes and fears thrown off with life ; Why am I charm'd by friendship's fond essays, And though unbodied, conscious of thy praise ; Has pride a portion in the parted soul ? Does passion still the firmless mind control?
Seite 258 - I give not heaven for lost . From this descent Celestial virtues rising, will appear More glorious and more dread than from no fall, And trust themselves to fear no second fate.
Seite 30 - If music be the food of love, play on; Give me excess of it: that surfeiting, The appetite may sicken, and so die. That strain again, it had a dying fall: O, it came o'er my ear, like the sweet sound That breathes upon a bank of violets; Stealing and giving odour.
Seite 74 - And on my soul hung the dull weight Of some intolerable fate. What bell was that ? Ah me ! Too much I know. My sweet companion, and my gentle peer, Why hast thou left me thus unkindly here, Thy end for ever, and my life to moan? O thou hast left me all alone ! Thy soul and body when death's agony Besieg'd around thy noble heart, Did not with more reluctance part Than I, my dearest friend, do part from thee.
Seite 292 - Wi' wings that I might flee, Then I wad travel o'er the main, My ae true love to see ; Then I wad tell a joyfu' tale To ane that's dear to me, And sit upon a king's window, And sing my melody. The adder lies i...

Bibliografische Informationen