The Study of a Novel

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D.C. Heath, 1905 - 331 Seiten
 

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Inhalt

The Paragraph
10
Minor Divisions
12
Prose and Verse
13
Dramatic and Nondramatic Form
15
Nondramatic Form
16
Dialogic Form in General
17
Duologue
18
Concerted Speech
19
Documentary Form in General
20
Syntax
22
Vocabulary
25
Phonology 87
27
CONSECUTIVE STRUCTURE SECTION PAGE 25 Significance of Consecutive Structure
28
Sequence
29
The Principal Masses
30
Sequence of Dramatic and Nondramatic Masses
31
Beginning Middle and End
32
Movement and Situation
33
Event and Incident
34
The Scene
36
Episode
37
Lines of Interest
38
The Line of Emotion
39
Points
40
Mass in Momentum
42
The Rate of Movement
43
Climax and Foiling
44
Reciprocity
45
Analysis of Simpler Narratives
46
CHAPTER III
47
Necessity and Ideality of Narrative Plot
48
Action and Narration
49
45 Story
51
The Plot Proper
52
The Single Action
53
Sequence of Simple Narratives
56
The Dramatic Line
57
The Climax
59
The Catastrophe
60
Motivation
62
Motivating Forces
63
The Narrator His Point of View
66
Temporal Point of View
67
Spatial Point of View
69
SECTION PACE 58 Character Point of View
71
Generalized Statement of Plot
72
Unity of Plot
73
Types of Plot
74
The Judgment of Plot
76
CHAPTER IV
78
Detailed Time Settings
79
General Place Setting
81
Detailed Place Settings
82
Circumstantial Settings
83
Reality Ideality and Truth
84
Vague and Exact Settings
85
Natural Social and Socialized Settings
86
Author and Dramatis Persomc
87
Distribution
88
Further Economy
89
CHAPTER V
91
Number
92
Chapter Distribution
93
Successive Groups
94
Foreground Middleground and Background Characters
96
Central Characters
97
Association of Characters
99
Relation to the Author
101
Reality and Ideality
102
Individuals and Types
104
Social Groups
105
Psychological Groups 107
107
CHARACTERIZATION SECTION TACK 88 Character and Characterization
109
Novelistic Characterization
110
Character Unfolding
111
Appellation
112
Physiognomy
113
Costume and Physical Environment
114
Pantomime
116
Utterance
117
Physiological Psychology
118
Pure Psychology
120
Identity Individuality and Type
121
Character Change
124
Direct and Indirect Characterization
125
General Methods
127
Group Characterization
128
CHAPTER VII
130
Human Nature
143
Nature in Man
144
The Supernatural
145
General Philosophy
147
The Main Theme
148
CHAPTER VIII
150
Objective and Subjective Aspects
151
Types of Style
152
The Novelistic Type
154
Comprehensiveness
155
Objectivity
156
Concreteness
158
Complexity
160
Secularity
161
Humor
162
Ideality
163
Force
164
Other Qualities
165
CHAPTER IX
166
The Germ of the Work
167
The Plan
169
The Sources
170
The Time Perspective
173
Technic of the Process
174
Psychology of the Process
176
Collaboration
180
CHAPTER X
181
The Data
182
Individuality of the Author
183
SECTION PAGE 150 The Authors Age
184
Sex
185
Personal Episode
186
National and Racial Influences
187
Linguistic Influence
191
Literary Influence
193
Historical Influence
195
Immediate Social Environment
197
Human Nature
198
The Influence of Nature
199
CHAPTER XI
202
The Data
203
Place Distribution
204
Influence upon Literature
205
Social Groups in General
207
Influence upon Individuals
208
Kind and Degree of Influence
209
Sensational Effect
211
Emotional Effect
212
Conceptual Effect
213
Volitional Effect
214
The Causes of Influence
216
CHAPTER XII
218
Prose and Poetry
219
Prose and Verse
220
The Short Story
221
The Epic
222
Biography
224
SECTION PAGE 182 History
225
The Essay
226
The Lyric
227
Journalism
229
Other Types of Literature
230
CHAPTER XIII
232
Gassification of the Arts
233
The Drama
234
Fainting
237
Sculpture
239
Music
241
Architecture
243
Landscape Gardening
245
CHAPTER XIV
247
Language as External Material
248
The Value of Form
249
Unity General Design
250
Contrast
252
Proportion
253
The Comic and the Tragic
254
The Beautiful and the Unbeautiful
256
Artistic Truth
257
Artistic Illusion
258
Theories of Art
260
Theories of the Novel
262
Judgment of a Novel
263
Systematic Analysis of a Novel
265
Types of Prose Fiction
279
Notes on the History of Novelistic Criticism
286
Index
319
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Seite 261 - Art is a human activity, consisting in this, that one man consciously, by means of certain external signs, hands on to others feelings he has lived through, and that other people are infected by these feelings, and also experience them.
Seite 229 - If we read of one man robbed, or murdered, or killed by accident, or one house burned, or one vessel wrecked, or one steamboat blown up, or one cow run over on the Western Railroad, or one mad dog killed, or one lot of grasshoppers in the winter, — we never need read of another. One is enough. If you are acquainted with the principle, what do you care for a myriad instances and applications...
Seite 143 - Just when I seemed about to learn! Where is the thread now? Off again! The old trick! Only I discern — Infinite passion and the pain Of finite hearts that yearn.
Seite 80 - The golden ripple on the wall came back again, and nothing else stirred in the room. The old, old fashion! The fashion that came in with our first garments, and will last unchanged until our race has run its course, and the wide firmament is rolled up like a scroll. The old, old fashion — Death!
Seite 293 - A novel is a large diffused picture, comprehending the characters of life, disposed in different groups, and exhibited in various attitudes, for the purposes of a uniform plan, and general occurrence, to which every individual figure is subservient. But this plan cannot be executed with propriety, probability, or success, without a principal personage to attract the attention, unite the incidents, unwind the clue of the labyrinth, and at last close...
Seite 302 - The only reason for the existence of a novel is that it does attempt to represent life.
Seite 73 - ... for want of a nail the shoe was lost; for want of a shoe the horse was lost; and for want of a horse the rider was lost...
Seite xii - To-day's brief passion limits their range; It seethes with the morrow for us and more. They are perfect — how else? they shall never change: We are faulty — why not ? we have time in store. The Artificer's hand is not arrested With us; we are rough-hewn, nowise polished: They stand for our copy, and, once invested With all they can teach, we shall see them abolished.
Seite 291 - THERE remains to be treated of, another species of composition in prose, which comprehends a very numerous, though, in general, a very insignificant class of writings, known by the name of Romances and Novels.
Seite 201 - Similarly, when I am reminded by any chance of what it was that the waves were always saying, I wander in my fancy for a whole winter night about the streets of Paris — as I really did, with a heavy heart, on the night when my little friend and I parted company for ever.

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