The Beauties of Sterne: Choice Selections from His Works

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Leavitt & Allen, 1853 - 160 Seiten
 

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Seite 119 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me and from my friends, be such frigid philosophy as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the ruins...
Seite 30 - He shall not drop, said my uncle Toby, firmly. A-wcll-a'day — do what we can for him, said Trim, maintaining his point, — the poor soul will die. He shall not die, by G— , cried my uncle Toby. — The ACCUSING SPIRIT, which flew up to Heaven's chancery with the oath, blushed as he gave it in, and the RECORDING ANGEL, as he wrote it down, dropped a tear upon the word, and blotted it out for ever.
Seite 155 - If there be any fallacy, it is not that we fancy the players, but that we fancy ourselves unhappy for a moment ; but we rather lament the possibility than suppose the presence of misery, as a mother weeps over her babe, when she remembers that death may take it from her.
Seite 30 - He will never march, an' please your honour, in this world, said the corporal: He will march, said my uncle Toby, rising up from the side of the bed, with one shoe off: An' please your honour, said the corporal, he will never march, but to his grave: He shall march, cried my uncle Toby, marching the foot which had a shoe on, though without advancing an inch, — he shall march to his regiment...
Seite 146 - What better can we do, than to the place Repairing where he judg'd us, prostrate fall Before him reverent, and there confess Humbly our faults, and pardon beg, with tears Watering the ground, and with our sighs the air Frequenting, sent from hearts contrite, in sign Of sorrow unfeign'd, and humiliation meek?
Seite 24 - I heard the poor gentleman say his prayers last night, said the landlady, very devoutly, and with my own ears, or I could not have believed it. Are you sure of it? replied the curate. A soldier, an' please your reverence, said I, prays as often (of his own accord) as a parson; and when he is fighting for his king, and for his own life, and for his honour too, he has the most reason to pray to God of any one in the whole world. 'Twas well said of thee, Trim, said my uncle Toby. But when a soldier,...
Seite 11 - Piety is the only proper and adequate relief of decaying man. He that grows old without religious hopes, as he declines into imbecility, and feels pains and...
Seite 24 - I thought it wrong, added the corporal. I think so, too, said my uncle Toby. When the lieutenant had taken his glass of sack and toast he felt himself a little revived, and sent down into the kitchen to let me know that in about ten minutes he should be glad if I would step upstairs. I believe...
Seite 144 - Jonathan (for that was the coachman's name), or Shrovetide, or any tide or time past, to this ? Are we not here now, continued the corporal (striking the end of his stick perpendicularly upon the floor, so as to give an idea of health and stability) — and are we not...
Seite 88 - I'll not hurt a hair of thy head: — Go, says he, lifting up the sash, and opening his hand as he spoke, to let it escape; — go, poor devil, get thee gone, why should I hurt thee? This world surely is wide enough to hold both thee and me.

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