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T H E
DR A M A TIC CENSOR
dedicates with esteem and respect, this

SECOND VOLUME

of humble Criticisms

to the

LIBERALITY of SentIMENT;

ORIGINALITY of GENIUS,
AFFLUENCE of CONCEPTION,

PLEASANTRY of EXPRESSION, WIT, HUMOUR, and INSTRUCTIVE SATIRE, which so peculiarly unite to ornament the

private and public character of Samuel Foote, Efq;

A D V ERTISEMENT.

A Sincere esteem for the Drama, ardent wishes for

the prosperity of the Stage, admiration of the beauties, and concern for the defeats, both in composition and action, firsi dictated this work ; which from many flattering instances of approbation, has, we apprebend, been condueted with some share of ability, upoil commendable principles : wherefore, the same plan will be pursued that we have hitherto odopied. Not one obječtion has been offered to our criticisms on tbe plays which have fallen under our notice ; as to our strictures on the performers,we have been accused by Some of too much lenity, by others, of too much severity ; a few of the most inconsiderable obje&is meniioned, have taken great umbrage at the supposed injury done their imaginary merits ; of their ignorant, illiberal resentment we have heard, with an equal mixture of pity and contempt ; resolved neither through fear nor favour to abate the smallest particle of that critical prarogative we have asumed ; however, the most abjeet, discontented murderers of common sense in eitlser house, may rail at the DRAMATIC Censor, secure from any trace of resentment for so doing, in this work, if as it is eagerly hoped some of the deficiencies pointed out are reformed, the ultimate view of this and the foriner Volume will be fulfilled.

In the wide field of observation before us, several passages and circumstances must no doubt escape, thoug? equally deserving regard with several of those we note: however, we flatter ourselves, nothing material has as 'yet sipped us, or will bereafter be omitted ; and that a review of the work when compleated will prove, that interest and malevolence, the two worst influences authors can write under, have been equally diftant both from our heads and bearts.

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THE

DRAMATIC CENSOR.

JULIUS CÆ S A R.

A TRAGEDY by SHAKESPEARE.

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F powerfully inculcating one of the noblest principles that actuates the human mind, the love of national liberty, can ftamp additional value upon works of genius, we may venture to pronounce the tragedy now before us, as to the subject of it, highly deserving of attention from an English audience; in respect of the executive part, a review of the several scenes will,we hope, furnish a competent idea.

At the commencement of this piece, the author introduces two Romans of character and public spirit reproving the mob with great energy for making holiday on Cæsar's account, in whose ambition the freedom of their country had found a grave. The remonstrances of Marullus and FlaVOL. II,

B

vius

1

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