Stuart of Dunleath: A Story of the Present Time, Band 1

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B. Tauchnitz, 1851 - 129 Seiten
 

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Seite 29 - So every spirit, as it is most pure, And hath in it the more of heavenly light, So it the fairer body doth procure To habit in, and it more fairly dight, With cheerful grace and amiable sight. For, of the soul, the body form doth take, For soul is form, and doth the body make.
Seite 65 - If all men were able to satisfy conscience and ambition by doing their duty in that state of life into which it had pleased God to call them, civilization would advance with but tardy steps.
Seite 39 - I arise from dreams of thee In the first sweet sleep of night, When the winds are breathing low, And the stars are shining bright; I arise from dreams of thee, And a spirit in my feet Has led me — who knows how? — To thy chamber window, sweet...
Seite 12 - A child's eyes ! those clear wells of undefiled thought — what on earth can be more beautiful ? Full of hope, love, and curiosity, they meet your own. In prayer, how earnest ; in joy, how sparkling ; in sympathy, how tender. The man who never tried the companionship of a little child has carelessly passed by one of the greatest pleasures of life, as one passes a rare flower without plucking it, or knowing its value.
Seite 13 - Speak to it of the holy things of your religion, of your grief for the loss of a friend, of your love for some one you fear will not love in return : — it will take, it is true, no measure or soundings of your thought ; it will not judge how much you should believe ; whether your grief is rational in proportion to your loss ; whether you are worthy or fit to attract the love which you seek ; but its whole soul will incline to yours, and engraft itself, as it were, on the feeling which is your feeling...
Seite 13 - ... pleasures of life, as one passes a rare flower without plucking it, or knowing its value. A child cannot understand you, you think ; speak to it of the holy things of your religion ; of your grief for the loss of a friend ; of your love for some one you fear will not love in return ; it will take, it is true, no...
Seite 11 - He marvelled at her intelligence ; grown persons are apt to put a lower estimate than is just, on the understandings of children. They rate them by what they know ; and children know very little; but their capacity of comprehension is great. Hence the continual wonder of those who are unaccustomed to them, at the
Seite 13 - A child cannot understand you, you think. Speak to it of the holy things of your religion, of your grief for the loss of a friend, of your love for some one you fear will not love in return: — it will take, it is true, no measure or soundings of your thought; it will not judge how much you should believe; whether your grief is...
Seite 119 - Ye were mine, flesh and soul ; mine, oh ! my children, A portion of myself is torn away ; The breath of life seems stifled in our parting, And death-like darkness clouds my lonely day ! A chill sick shudder thrills my yearning bosom, Where never more your gentle arms shall twine ; The memory of your voices doubles anguish, Your voices, that no longer answer mine ! Yet cease, my soul...
Seite 126 - ... was not David's wife but herself who had been the real love of his life. Mrs. Norton declares : "Oh feel sure, Eleanor! He spoke no more than truth when he told you, you were his ideal of love and loveliness. The woman who is so loved may have successors, as she has had predecessors ; but rivals she has none. Lone and different as the moon in a heaven full of stars, she remains in the world of that man's heart. He has known other women, and he has known her. It may be the love of his youth, or...

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