Theories of Social Progress: A Critical Study of the Attempts to Formulate the Conditions of Human Advance

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Macmillan, 1918 - 579 Seiten
 

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Seite 337 - It is a partnership in all science, a partnership in all art, a partnership in every virtue, and in all perfection. As the ends of such a partnership cannot be obtained in many generations, it becomes a partnership not only between those who are living, but between those who are living, those who are...
Seite 114 - CIVILIZATION, taken in its wide ethnographic sense, is that complex whole which includes knowledge, belief, art, morals, law, custom, and any other capabilities and habits acquired by man as a member of society.
Seite 408 - And the Lord said, Behold the people is one, and they have all one language ; and this they begin to do : and now nothing will be restrained from them, which they have imagined to do.
Seite 183 - Hitherto it is questionable if all the mechanical inventions yet made have lightened the day's toil of any human being. They have enabled a greater population to live the same life of drudgery and imprisonment, and an increased number of manufacturers and others to make fortunes.
Seite 519 - I call therefore a complete and generous education, that which fits a man to perform justly, skilfully, and magnanimously all the offices, both private and public, of peace and war.
Seite 359 - With respect to them it may be laid down that social necessities and social opinion are always more or less in advance of Law. We may come indefinitely near to the closing of the gap between them, but it has a - /perpetual tendency to reopen. Law is stable-: / the societies we are speaking of are progressive,. \ The greater or less happiness of a people depends v- > on the degree of promptitude with which the gulf is narrowed.
Seite 182 - ... the art of directing the great sources of power in nature for the use and convenience of man, as the means of production and of traffic in states.
Seite 499 - For, don't you mark ? we're made so that we love First when we see them painted, things we have passed Perhaps a hundred times nor cared to see; And so they are better, painted — better to us, Which is the same thing. Art was given for that; God uses us to help each other so, Lending our minds out.
Seite 202 - The materialist conception of history starts from the proposition that the production of the means to support human life, and, next to production, the exchange of things produced, is the basis of all social structure...
Seite 501 - What is a man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed? a beast, no more. Sure he that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and god-like reason To fust in us unus'd.

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