Douglas Jerrold's Shilling Magazine, Band 6

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Punch Office, 1847
Contains Douglas Jerrold's novel St. Giles and St. James (selected issues, no. 1-29), illustrated by Leech.
 

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Seite 175 - A spirit of innovation is generally the result of a selfish temper and confined views. People will not look forward to posterity, who never look backward to their ancestors.
Seite 175 - ... the mode of existence decreed to a permanent body composed of transitory parts ; wherein, by the disposition of a stupendous wisdom, moulding together the great mysterious incorporation of the human race, the whole, at one time, is never old, or middleaged, or young, but, in a condition of unchangeable constancy, moves on through the varied tenour of perpetual decay, fall, renovation, and progression.
Seite 175 - Our political system is placed in a just correspondence and symmetry with the order of the world, and with the mode of existence decreed to a permanent body composed of transitory parts ; wherein, by the disposition of a stupendous wisdom, moulding together the great mysterious incorporation of the human race...
Seite 234 - Of its own beauty is the mind diseased, And fevers into false creation ; — where, Where are the forms the sculptor's soul hath seized ? In him alone. Can Nature show so fair...
Seite 176 - ... that action and counteraction which, in the natural and in the political world, from the reciprocal struggle of discordant powers, draws out the harmony of the universe.
Seite 324 - ... looks all wonder At all things the heavens under, Tiny scorns of smiled reprovings That have more of love than lovings, Mischiefs done with such a winning Archness that we prize such sinning, Breakings dire of plates and glasses, Graspings small at all that passes, Pullings off of all that's...
Seite 556 - in which the conversation turned on the civil war, what could be conceived more impertinent than for a person to ask abruptly, What was the value of a Roman denarius ? On a little reflection, however, I was easily able to trace the train of thought which suggested the question : for, the original subject of discourse naturally introduced the history of the king, and of the treachery of those who surrendered his person to his enemies ; this again introduced the treachery of Judas Iscariot, and the...
Seite 174 - Men, my brothers, men the workers, ever reaping something new : That which they have done but earnest of the things that they shall do...
Seite 175 - In this choice of inheritance we have given to our frame of polity the image of a relation in blood; binding up the constitution of our country with our dearest domestic ties ; adopting our fundamental laws into the bosom of our family affections ; keeping inseparable, and cherishing with the warmth of all their combined and mutually reflected charities, our state, our hearths, our sepulchres, and our altars.
Seite 120 - For now I stand as one upon a rock, Environed with a wilderness of sea ; Who marks the waxing tide grow wave by wave, Expecting ever when some envious surge Will in his brinish bowels swallow him.

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