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discards the queen from all power, and confines her
for life, 60; resolves to gain the affections of his
people, ib. declares war against the Scots, ib. places
Edward Baliol on the throne of Scotland, 61 ; raises
an army against the Scots, ib. prevails on his parlia-
ment to grant him a supply, ib enters Scotland, and
lays fiege to Berwick, ib. obtains a complete victory
over the Scots, ib. returns in triumph to England,
62 ; again repairs to Scotland to quell another insar-
rection, ib. repairs a third time to Scotland, ib. lays
claim to the regency of France, 64 ; is opposed by
Philip Valois, who is appointed regent of that king-
dom, ib. does homage to Philip, ib. disputes the
crown of France with Philip, ib. declares war against
him, ib. is affifted in his designs against France, by
one James Ardevelt, a brewer of Ghent, 65; re-
ceives a supply from his parliament, ib. fails over to
Flanders, ib. asserts his claim to the crown of France,
ib. receives, and accepts a challenge from Philip, to
fight him in single combat, ib. bis naval forces meet
with great success, 66; concludes a truce with France,
ib. again declares war against France, at the instiga-
tion of the count de Montfort, ib. all his hopes fruf-
trated by the imprisonment of Montfort, ib. is a listed
by Jane of Flanders, ib. sends succours to Jane, 67;
lands at Mordian, with an army of twelve thousand
men, 68; besieges some of the most capital of the
enemies fortifications, ib. forms a truce with France,
ib. breaks the truce, and fends the earl of Derby to
defend the province of Guienne, ib. is obliged, by
Philip, to give up most of his conquests, ib. embarks
at Southampton with a considerable fleet for France,
69; takes with him his eldest son, the prince of
Wales, surnamed the Black Prince, ib, lands at la
Hogue with a numerous army, ib. spreads devastation
through the whole country, ib. takes the city of Caen,
ib. is vigorously opposed by Philip, ib narrowly ef-
capes a Inare laid for him, ib. determines to give the
French battle, 70; his prudent disposition of his
army, ib. his exemplary behaviour before the battle,
ib. attacks the enemy, 71 ; his remarkable message to

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the prince of Wales, 72; obtains a complete victory by means of his fon, 73 ; his affectionate reception of 'his fon after the battle, ib. lays fiege to Calais, 74; determines to reduce it by famine, it takes Calais after a twelvemonth's siege, ib. resolves to punish the obstinate reliftance of the tow.ifmen, ib. agrees to spare their lives on certain conditions, 75; makes a cruel determination against them, ib. consents to pardon them at the intercession of the queen, ib. orders all the French inhabitants to leave Calais, and peoples it with English, 76; makes it the market for wool, ib. is in danger of losing Calais by the treachery of an Italian, ib. takes a bloody revenge on the French, ib. his kingdom depopulated by a pestilential disease, 77; a rebellion formed against him in Scotland, ib. his queen Philippa heads an army against the Scors, and comes off victorious, 78; breaks the truce with France, 79; fends Edward the Black Prince into France with a considerable army, ib. enters France, and ravages the country, ib. endeavours 'to bring the dauphin to hazard a battle, 83; concludes a peace with France, ib. fets the king of France at liberty, 84 ; loses all his conquests in France, 86; becomes contemptible at home, 87 ; endeavours to find comfort in the arms of his mitress, ib. his grief for the loss of the prince of Wales, ib. banishes his mistress, Alice Pierce, ib. takes her again, ib. his fallen situation, 88; his death, ib, his institution of the order

of the garter, 89; his issue, ib. Edward IV, opposes Henry VI. and claims the crown,

164; his great popularity, 165; is proclaimed king by the people, ib. heads an army of forty thousand men to oppose Margaret, ib. obtains a complete victory, 166; is seated on the throne of England, and his title acknowledged by parliament, 167; his disposition, ib. consents to marry Bona of Savoy, 168 ; marries Elizabeth Woodville, ib. quarrels with the earl of Warwick, ib. a combination formed against him by Warwick, ib heads a numerous army against the rebels, 199; obtains an advantage over Warwick,

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who flies to France, ib is overpowered by the strength of the rebels, and obliged to fly the kingdom, ib. embarks on board a small fleet at Lynn, 170; lands in Holland, ib. assembles a force and lands in Yorkshire, ib. repairs to London, where the inhabitants open their gates to receive him, ib. marches to give Warwick battle, 171 ; obtains a complete victory, 172 ; a rebellion formed against him, headed by the earl of Pembroke, ib. obtains a complete victory at Tewksbury,, and takes the queen and her son prisoners, 173 ; his barbarous usage of the young prince, ib. his cruel proceedings, 175; enters into a war with France, 176 ; has a conference with Lewis, and agrees to return with his army to England, ib. his tyrannical behaviour, ib. his inconsistent conduct, 177; his

death, character, and issue, 178. Edward V. mounts the English throne, 179; is taken by his uncle, the duke of Gloucester, from under the care of the earl Rivers, 180; is conducted by Gloucester to London, ib. is conveyed by his uncle to the Tower, ib. his coronation prevented by Gloucester, ib. his death, 87.

the Black Prince, attends his father into Normandy, 69 ; commands the first line at Cressy, 70; his astonishing behaviour, 72; sent into France at the head of an army, 79; penetrates into the heart of France, ib. defeats the French army, 81; conducts his royal captive, the French king, through London, 82; defeats the French in Caftile, 85; attacked by a

consumptive disorder, 86; his death and character, 87. Egremont, fir John, chosen leader of the rebels, 204;

defeated and flies to the dutchess of Burgundy, 205. Empson, one of Henry's minister's, account of, 221;

examined before the council, 227 ; condemned and executed, 228.

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FALKIRK, battle of, 29

Fisher, John, bishop of Rochester, his unmerited sufferings, 261; beheaded for denying the king's fupremacy, ib.

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the prince of Wales, 72; obtains a complete victory by means of his fon, 73; his affectionate reception of 'his son after the battle, ib. lays siege to Calais, 74; determines to reduce it by famine, ib takes Calais after a twelvemonth's fiege, ib. refolves to punish the obstinate resistance of the tow.ismen, ib. agrees to spare their lives on certain conditions, 75; makes a cruel determination against them, ib. condents to par. don them at the intercession of the queen, ib. orders all the French inhabitants to leave Calais, and peoples it with English, 76; makes it the market for wool, ib. is in danger of losing Calais by the treachery of an Italian, ib. takes a bloody revenge on the French, ib. his kingdom depopulated by a peftilential disease, 77; a rebellion formed againit him in Scotland, ib. his queen Philippa heads an army against the Scots, and comes off victorious, 78; breaks the truce with France, 79; fends Edward the Black Prince into France with a considerable army, ib. enters France, and ravages the country, ib. endeavours to bring the dauphin to hazard a battle, 83; concludes a peace with France, ib. fets the king of France at liberty, 84 ; loses all his conquests in France, 86; becomes contemptible at home, 87; endeavours to find com. foit in the arms of his mistress, ib. his grief for the loss of the prince of Wales, ib. banillies his mistress, Alice Pierce, ib. takes her again, ib. his fallen situation, 88; his death, ib. his institution of the order

of the garter, 89; his issue, ib. Edward IV, opposes Henry VI. and claims the crown,

164; his great popularity, 165; is proclaimed king by the people, ib. heads an army of forty thousand men to oppose Margaret, ib. obtains a complete vice tory, 166; is seated on the throne of England, and his title acknowledged by parliament, 167; his dispo. fition, ib. confents to marry Bona of Savoy, 168 ; marries Elizabeth Woodville, ib. quarrels with the earl of Warwick, ib. a combination formed against him by Warwick, ib heads a numerous army against the rebels, 199; obtains an advantage over Warwick,

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Hennebone, besieged by Charles le Blois, 67; relieved

by the English, ib. Henry IV. when duke of Hereford, deprived of his in

heritance, 104; takes the title of duke of Lancaster, 105 ; lands in Yorkshire, ib. is joined by a powerful army, ib. his interest espoused by the duke of York, 106; his proud answer to Richard II. 107; elected king, 108; a rebellion formed against him, 113 ; endeavours to quell the tumult, ib. orders some of the principal rebels to be beheaded, 114; concludes a iruce with France, 115; rebellions formed against him in Scotland and Wales, ib. his impolitic conduct with respect to the duke of Northumberland, who raises a rebellion against him, 116; obtains a complete victory over the rebels, 118; pardons the duke of Northumberland, 119; a second rebellion formed against him, headed by Northumberland, ib. quells the insurrection, 120; puts to death the archbishop of York, and the earl of Nottingham, ib. sides with the church, 121; signs a writ for burning William Sawtre, an heretic, ib. endeavours to acquire popularity, 122 ; is distressed at the behaviour of the prince of Wales, ib. is seized with a fit before the shrine of Edward the Confessor, 124; his death and character,

ib. his issue, ib. Henry V. when prince of Wales, his excesses, 122 ;

strikes one of the judges on the bench, ib is committed to prison, 127 ; takes the crown from his father's pillow, ib. ascends the English throne, 126; his behaviour to his former companions, ib. favours his father's friends, ib. orders the funeral obsequies of Richard II. to be performed with royal folemnity, 127; his peace disturbed by the clergy, ib. endeavours to convert lord Cobham, 128; gives that nobleman up to the fury of his enemies, ib. quells a dangerous tumult, ib. determines on a war with France, 129; fends an embassy to Paris, ib his demands refused, ib. assembles a great Acet and sets fail from Southampton, 130; lands at Harfleur at the head of a considerable army, ib. takes Harfleur, and puts all the garrison the sword, ib. his army greatly weakened by a conta

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