The Lady's Companion, Or, Sketches of Life, Manners, and Morals, at the Present Day

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H.C. Peck & Theo. Bliss, 1854 - 288 Seiten
 

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Seite 93 - Stern Lawgiver! yet thou dost wear The Godhead's most benignant grace; Nor know we anything so fair As is the smile upon thy face: Flowers laugh before thee on their beds And fragrance in thy footing treads; Thou dost preserve the stars from wrong; And the most ancient heavens, through Thee, are fresh and strong.
Seite 53 - ... beauty, spreads them because it was ordained to do so ; and after all, had Miss Daffy been philosophically examined upon her proneness to faint, she would have attributed the habit to no self-complacency, but to the simple but inevitable truth that she was made to faint. She would not have recognised any beauty in the art of fainting, but merely the natural consequence that to faint was feminine.
Seite 38 - Never mind," said the small man. " I was called the Poor Man's Friend. . And I can tell you, Mrs. Atkins, that I have paid pretty sharply for the vanity and vexation of the title." " That is, I suppose," answered the spirited little woman, " you wasn't his friend at all ? Only the name, like ? " "Listen to my story," said the little gentleman, again shifting himself among the holly leaves. "I was, when I was alive, and enjoying my proper stature, I was a man of exceeding wealth Rich indeed was I,...
Seite 283 - And she said unto her father, Let this thing be done for me; let me alone two months, that I may go up and down upon the mountains and bewail my virginity, I and my fellows.
Seite 246 - Oh, no - no, dear Walter, not the bracelet." "Yes - yes - I say yes. Though not a quarrel, this is a sorrow which has come between us, and there must be a peace-offering. Besides, I would not have you think that you had reached the limits of my will, and of my means to gratify you.
Seite 238 - Lucy," she exclaimed as she entered Lady Lucy's sanctum; "need not inquire of health, you look si charmante. Oh, si belle! - that make you wear old clothes so longer dan oder ladies, and have so leetel for me to buy. Milady Lucy Ferrars know she look well in anyting, but yet she should not wear old clothes: no right - for example - for de trade, and de hoosband always like de wife well dressed - ha - ha!" Poor Lady Lucy! Too sick at heart to have any relish for Madame Dalmas...
Seite 36 - ... in the miniature man a well-known face ; one of those countenances that, like a royal face upon a shilling, is the property of every body who can possess it. She had seen a picture of the Poor Man's Friend, and — no, it could not be he ; it was impossible — nevertheless, the face of the manikin was wondrously like that fleshand-blood goodness. And the little gentleman, though somewhat uneasily, sat among a sprig of Christmas holly that was upon the mantel-piece ; sat, and with his best pains,...
Seite 35 - ... alone, Mrs. Atkins spread the table. There was a piece of beef left, and a small piece of plumpudding ; and still the pudding remained small, although Mrs. Atkins turned the plate that contained it round and round half-a-dozen times, and took half-adozen side-long looks at it, as though endeavoring to behold it in the most improved light. But pudding is not to be thus magnified. The table laid, Mrs. Atkins thought she would execute a few more stitches, filling up the time until Atkins and the...
Seite 199 - And now the child altogether unclosed his eyes, and gazed into the bright glorious countenance of the Angel, and at the same moment they found themselves in the Paradise of God, where joy and blessedness for ever dwell. And God folded the dead child to His heart, and he received wings like the other Angel, and flew hand in hand with him. And all the flowers, also, God folded to His heart, but upon the poor withered wild flower He breathed a kiss, and a voice was given to it, and it sang together...
Seite 245 - And it is of you I have been afraid !" cried Lady Lucy, clinging to his hand. " You who I thought would never make any excuses for faults you yourself could not have committed !" " I have never been tempted." " Have I ? I dare not say so." " Tell me how it all came about," said Mr. Ferrars, drawing her to him ; " tell me from the beginning." But his gentleness unnerved her — she felt choking — loosened the collar of her dress for breathing space — and gave him the knowledge he asked in broken...

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