Hannah Hawkins: The Reformed Drunkard's Daughter

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American Temperance Union, 1843 - 72 Seiten
 

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Seite 62 - It is good neither to eat flesh nor to drink wine, nor anything whereby thy brother stumbleth or is offended or is made weak.
Seite 30 - neath a blow a father dealt, And the cold, proud world's scorn : Thus struggle on from year to year, Thy sole relief the scalding tear. Go, weep as I have wept O'er a loved father's fall ; See every cherished promise swept, Youth's sweetness turned to gall ; Hope's faded flowers strewed all the way That led me up to woman's day.
Seite 48 - Doth not each rain-drop help to form The cool, refreshing shower, And every ray of light to warm And beautify the flower...
Seite 67 - ... to be disputed. By degrees it began also to assume with me somewhat more of a personal character. I could not see how I was right while indulging in what was so fearfully destructive to others, and to some whom I had known and loved. Yet such was the force of habit ; such my willingness to believe what doctors told me, that wine was necessary to my health, at that time far from good ; and such, also, was my dependence upon stimulants, for increasing the strength of which I often felt miserably...
Seite 31 - This promise to the deadly cup, And led her down -from love and light, From all that made her pathway bright, And chained her there mid want and strife, That lowly thing, — a drunkard's wife ! And stamped on childhood's brow, so mild, That withering blight, — a drunkard's child...
Seite 67 - ... my belief, that nothing could be more likely than the restraint of a public pledge to create an immediate inclination to break it. For two years — years I may say of total ignorance on this point, during which I took no pains to make myself better informed, I treated the subject with the utmost contempt whenever it was brought under my notice. By degrees, however, it began to wear a different aspect before the world in general, and facts were too powerful in its favour ta be disputed.
Seite 67 - ... personal character. I could not see how I was right while indulging in what was so fearfully destructive to others, and to some whom I had known and loved. Yet such was the force of habit; such my willingness to believe what doctors told me, that wine was necessary to my health, at that time far from good ; and such, also, was my dependence upon stimulants, for increasing the strength of which I often felt miserably in want, that three years more elapsed before I had the resolution to free myself...
Seite 25 - Not a being to take me by the hand, and lead or help me along, and say you can. I was friendless; without help or light; an outcast. My wife came up stairs, and knew I was suffering, and asked me to go down to breakfast. I had a pint of...
Seite 62 - Wo unto the world because of offences ! for it must needs be that offences come: but wo to that man by whom the offence cometh.
Seite 68 - I was, while in the habit of taking wine for my health, subject to almost constant suffering from a mysterious kind of sinking, which rendered me at times wholly unfit either for mental or bodily effort, but which I always found to be removed by a glass of wine. My spirits, too, partook of the malady...

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