The Two Angels: And Other Poems

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Simpkin, Marshall, 1875 - 232 Seiten
 

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Seite 73 - I lift wee Jamie up the bed, An' as I straik each croon, I whisper, till my heart fills up, "O bairnies, cuddle doon." The bairnies cuddle doon at nicht Wi' mirth that's dear to me; But sune the big warl's cark an' care Will quaten doon their glee.
Seite 119 - ... sings, When, as if thought and act were one, He came ; the gray on neck and wings Turn'd white against the happy sun. I knew his well-known sober flight, That boyhood made so dear to me ; And, blessings on him ! he stopp'd in sight, And sang where I could hear and see. Two simple notes were all he sang, And yet my manhood fled away ; Dear God ! The earth is always young, And I am young with it to-day. A wondrous realm of early joy Grew all around as I became Among my mates a bearded boy, That...
Seite 72 - I want a piece"— The rascal starts them a'. I rin an' fetch them pieces, drinks— They stop awee the soun'— Then draw the blankets up, an' cry, "Noo, weanies, cuddle doon!" But ere five minutes gang, wee Rab Cries oot, frae 'neath the claes, "Mither, mak' Tam gie ower at ance: He's kittlin' wi' his taes." The mischief's in that Tam for tricks; He'd bother half the toon. But aye I hap them up, an' cry, "Oh, bairnies, cuddle doon!
Seite 72 - Your faither's comin' in." They never heed a word I speak. I try to gie a froon; But aye I hap them up, an' cry "Oh, bairnies, cuddle doon!" Wee Jamie wi' the curly heid — He aye sleeps next the wa' — Bangs up an' cries, "I want a piece
Seite 59 - Take a part in the happy rite, and pull from his hand the glove; And still as we joked between ourselves, he would say, in his manly pride, That the very ring of the engine-wheels had something in them of love. At length we had just one run to make before the bridal took place, And it happen'd to be in the night, yet merry in heart we went on ; But long ere he came to the house, he was turning each moment his face To catch the light by the window, placed as a beacon for him alone. "Now then, Joe...
Seite 73 - Hae a' the weans been gude?" he asks, As he pits afF his shoon. "The bairnies, John, are in their beds, An
Seite 211 - He is made one with Nature. There is heard His voice in all her music, from the moan Of thunder to the song of night's sweet bird. He is a presence to be felt and known In darkness and in light, from herb and stone ; Spreading itself where'er that Power may move Which has withdrawn his being to its own...
Seite 25 - And strike a chord that beat not unison With all this joy ; for from our dreams and smiles We shrunk, and, with a shadow in our eyes, We struck upon the cypress'd edge of death. Then solemn grew our converse, and she spoke In low sweet whispers, which to me were spells Of deeper quiet, as she strove to make A land wherein a great world moves like ours Distinct and clear to all the grosser eye; And simple as herself she painted heaven. She knew not, as she spoke, how all my heart Follow'd her words,...
Seite 62 - Tak' him whaur nae kiss is gaun When he waukens up. Whatna noise is that I hear Coomin' doon the street? Weel I ken the dump, dump, O' her beetle feet; Mercy me! she's at the door! Hear her lift the sneck; Wheesht, an' cuddle mammy noo, Closer roun
Seite 59 - At length we had just one run to make before the bridal took place, And it happen'd to be in the night, yet merry in heart we went on ; But long ere he came to the house, he was turning each moment his face To catch the light by the window, placed as a beacon for him alone. "Now then, Joe," he said, with his hand on my arm, "keep a steady look out ahead While I whistle for the last time ; " and he whistled sharply and clear ; But no light rose up at the sound ; and he look'd with something like dread...

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