The Poetical Works of Andrew Marvell: With a Memoir of the Author

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Little, Brown, 1857 - 335 Seiten
 

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Seite 132 - While round the armed bands Did clap their bloody hands. He nothing common did, or mean, Upon that memorable scene, But with his keener eye The axe's edge did try; Nor called the Gods with vulgar spite To vindicate his helpless right ; But bowed his comely head Down, as upon a bed.
Seite 113 - Your sacred plants, if here below, Only among the plants will grow; Society is all but rude To this delicious solitude. No white nor red was ever seen So amorous as this lovely green. Fond lovers, cruel as their flame, Cut in these trees their mistress
Seite 49 - HAD we but world enough, and time, This coyness, lady, were no crime. We would sit down, and think which way To walk, and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Should'st rubies find: I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews...
Seite 44 - I have a garden of my own, But so with roses overgrown, And lilies, that you would it guess To be a little wilderness, And all the springtime of the year It only loved to be there.
Seite 45 - twould boldly trip, And print those roses on my lip. But all its chief delight was still On roses thus itself to fill, And its pure virgin limbs to fold In whitest sheets of lilies cold : Had it lived long, it would have been Lilies without, roses within.
Seite 24 - Bind me, ye woodbines, in your twines; Curl me about, ye gadding vines; And oh so close your circles lace, That I may never leave this place; But, lest your fetters prove too weak, Ere I your silken bondage break, Do you, O brambles, chain me too, And, courteous briars, nail me through.
Seite 111 - So the soul, that drop, that ray Of the clear fountain of eternal day, Could it within the human flower be seen, Remembering still its former height, Shuns the sweet leaves and blossoms green; And, recollecting its own light, Does, in its pure and circling thoughts, express The greater heaven in an heaven less.
Seite 105 - Thou tread'st upon enchanted ground ; Perils and snares beset thee round : Beware of all ; guard every part ; But most the traitor in thy heart. 5 Come, then, my soul ! now learn to wield The weight of thine immortal shield ; Put on the armor from above Of heavenly truth, and heavenly love.
Seite 112 - While all flowers and all trees do close To weave the garlands of repose! Fair Quiet, have I found thee here, And Innocence, thy sister dear? Mistaken long, I sought you then In busy companies of men.
Seite 134 - But from this valour sad Shrink underneath the plaid — Happy, if in the tufted brake The English hunter him mistake, Nor lay his hounds in near The Caledonian deer. But Thou, the War's and Fortune's son, March indefatigably on...

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