The Life of Gov. Louis Kossuth: With His Public Speeches in the United States, and a Brief History of the Hungarian War of Independence

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W. Lord, 1852 - 184 Seiten
 

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Seite 97 - ... the work of your laborious days and of your sleepless nights ; and to know that the people •will judge you, not by what you have felt, thought, and written, but by what the censor wills ; to know that the ground upon which you stand is not a ground known to you, because limited by rules, but an unknown, slippery ground, the limits of which lie but within the arbitrary pleasure of your censor, doomed by profession to be stupid, and a coward, and a...
Seite 94 - I can not forbear to mention, gentlemen. I boldly declare that beyond the United States there exists scarcely a practical freedom of the Press — at least in Europe, not except perhaps Norway, of whose condition, in that respect, I am not quite aware. You know, gentlemen, how the Press is fettered throughout the European continent — even, for the present, in France itself, whose great nation, by a strange fate, sees, under a nominally republican but centralized government, all the glorious fruits...
Seite 141 - Rome, who, with an earnest word of self-conscious majesty, controlled the condition of the world and arrested mighty kings in their ambitious march, thus, full of admiration and of reverence, I stand before you, legislators of the new capitol — that glorious hall of your people's collective majesty. The capitol of old yet stands, but the spirit has departed from it and come over to yours, purified by the air of liberty.
Seite 147 - ... into the dungeons of Austria. Well, God's will be done. The heart may break but duty will be done. We will stand in our place, though to us in Europe there be no fair play. But so much I hope, that no just man on earth can charge me with unbecoming arrogance, when here, on this soil of freedom, I kneel down and raise my prayer to God — "Almighty Father of Humanity, will Thy merciful arm not raise a power on earth to protect the law of nations, when there are so many to violate it ?" It is a...
Seite 148 - ... inconsistent with its own welfare, its own security, its own interest. I rather repeatedly and earnestly declared that a war on this account by your country is utterly impossible, and a mere phantom. I always declared that the United States remained masters of their actions, and under every circumstance will act as they judge consistent with the supreme duties to themselves. But I said and say that such a declaring of just principles would insure to the nations of Europe fair play in their struggle...
Seite 146 - Europe — we, unhappily, have no such fair play with us, against every palpitation of liberty. All despots are united in a common league, and you may be sure despots will never yield to the moral influence of your great example. They hate the very existence of this example, It is the sorrow of their thoughts and the incubus of their dreams. To stop its moral influence abroad, and to check its spreading development at home, is what they wish, instead of yielding to its influence.
Seite 147 - ... prayer and my aim, and be it your will to pronounce, or be it your will not to take notice of it, I will understand your will, and bow before it with devotion, love, and gratitude to your generous people, to your glorious land. But one single word, even here, I may be permitted to say, only such a word as may secure me from, being misunderstood. I came to the noble-minded people of the United States to claim its generous operative sympathy for the impending struggle of oppressed freedom on the...
Seite 159 - Gentlemen, the progress of things is unquestionably onward. It is onward with respect to Hungary ; it is onward everywhere. Public opinion, in my estimation at least, is making great progress. It will penetrate all resources ; it will come more or less to animate all minds ; and in respect to that country for which our sympathies to-night have been so strongly invoked, I cannot but say that I think the people of Hungary are an enlightened, industrious, sober, well-inclined community ; and I wish...
Seite 155 - Thus it is evident that, in point of power, so far as power depends upon population, Hungary possesses as much power as England proper, or even as the kingdom of Prussia. Well, then, there is population enough, there are people enough. Who, then, are they ? They are distinct from the nations that surround them. They are distinct from the Austrians on the west, and the Turks on the east ; and I will say, in the next place, that they are an enlightened nation. They have their history, they have their...
Seite 143 - Republic, his down-trodden country's wrongs, and its intimate connection with the fate of the European continent, and with the boldness of a just cause, claiming the principles of the Christian religion to be raised to a law of nations ; and to see not only the boldness of the poor exile forgiven, but to see him consoled by the sympathy of millions, encouraged by individuals...

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