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6. Lotus, (brig) T. Wilson, from Greenock 23rd August.

Alexander, J. G. Jones, from Mauritius 28th Nov. and Covelong 22nd January. Passenger from Mauritius :-Mr. James Doward.

Tauje, (A.) Hajee Almas, from Bombay 22nd Oct. and Aleppe 9th November.

Ruby, Thos. Hill, from Madras 10th and Covelong 20th January. Passenger from Madras :-Mr. J.J. Jein. 7. Thalia, W. H. Biden, from London 18th Sept. and Cape of Good Hope 5th Dec.

Passengers from London ::-Mrs. Carter; Mrs. H. Forsyth, Mrs. Absabon, Misses Tickell, King, and Walker, Col. Tombs, Capt. Conslade, Capt. Williams, Ensign A. Hogg, H. M. 41th Regt. Messrs. John Turner, J. Adams, Davidson, and W. Skinner, Cadets ; Children, W. Carter, Vernon Carter, Caroline Carter, Isabella Carter, Matilda Carter, Samuel Carter, and Robert Carter.

10. Novo Dourado, (P. Bark) M. T. DaLuz, from Macao 15th Dec.,(Singapore date not mentioned), and Penang 22nd January.

Passengers :-M. De Mello, Merchant. From Penang, J. Aah, Apothecary.
11. Mercury, (bark) C. Bell, from Singapore 22nd January.
Passengers : -Mr. Whitehead, and Mr. E. Cockley.

Dover, (Amr.) John Austin, from Boston, 24th August. Passengers :-Mrs. Hill, Thos. Hill, and Eliza Hill, children ; Mr. Edward Austin, Supercargo, Mr. H. Brook, Clerk, Mr. W.C. Gorham ; Thos. Dunn, Mr. T. H. C. Brown, and Mr. W, Sentas. 12. Magicienne, (H. M. S.) J. H. Plumridge, from Madras 31st January.

Georgian (Amr.) J. Land, from Philadelphia 5th Sept. and Singapore 20th Jan. 13. Adelaide, (barque) A. Steel, from Cochin 22nd and Aleppe 25th December.

Caledonia, (ditto) A. Symers, from Penang 25th November. Passengers :-Mrs. Davidson and child, Mrs. Malardith and child, Capt. Davidson, 13th Regt. Ñ. I. Capt. Allan, C. C. Jackson, Esq. B. C. S. Suppanjee Moosamanjee, Esq. one European and eight natives, one European and one Malay Female Servant.

Resolution, G. Jellicoe, from Madras. 16. Victoire Lise, (Fr. bark) from Bourbon, 18th December. 17. Louisa, (Schooner) W. C. Walker, from Penang, 17th January. 19. Anue Schooner, H. Murphy, from Ceylon 23rd December, and Madras 5th Feb.

20. Sir Archibald Campbell, (brig) C. Robertson, from Singapore 13th and Penang 24th January 23. King William the Fourth, E. D. O. Eales, from Bombay, 16th and Cochin 20th Jan, Passenger from Bombay:-Mr. Butler, Mariner.

Nerbudda, F. Patrick, from Port Louis, 17th Nov. Madras, 8th Jan. and Cheduba, 17th February.

Will Watch, W. Barrington, from Madras 14th February. Passengers :--Mrs. Maidman, Miss Pringell, Miss Collins-Rey. T. Hodson, Mr. Frith, Mr. J. Bruce, Mr. J. Gonsalves, and Mr. N. Antony.

DEPARTURES.
JAN.

25. Falcon, D. Ovenstone, for China.
26. Futtle Main, (Arab) Syed Mahomed, for Muscat.

Amelia, (Portuguese) J. J. Rebeiro, for Lisbon.

Abgarris, T. S. Rogers, for Bombay.
29. Nassur, (A.) Hajee Amber, for Muscat.
FEB.
5. Benconlen, (H. C. C. S.) Tullis, for London.

Malcolm, Eyles, for London.
7. Emma, (Schooner) J. King, for Khyouk Phyoo.

Ernaad, J. L. Gillet, for Madras.
11. Hydrose, (Bark) Nacoda, for Madras.

L'Victoride, F. E. Lefort, for Havre De Grace. 13. Arnold Wells, (Amr.) F. Dawson, for New-York. 14. Hamon Shaw, (Brig) R. G. Wilson, for Penang. 15. Mellekel Behar, (A.) Mahomed Rajah, for Red Sea.

Maria, (Scbooner) T. Daniel, for Moulmein. 16. Sultan, T. Mitchell, for Madras. 18. James Pattison, Thos. Bolton, for London.

Kusrovie, H. M. Potter, for Persian Gulph. 21. Lord Amherst, J. Hicks, for London.

Constance, (F.) C. Gellis, for Bourbon.

Anna, (Brig) J. Somerville, for Masulipatam. 23. Victoire, (F.) J. Desse, for Havre De Grace.

Fyzrobany, R. Noyes, for Muscat. 24. Lotus, (Brig) Thos. Wilson, for London.

lodus, (French; C. Balais, for Bourbon.

Meteorological Register, kept at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, for the Month of January, 1833. Minimum Temperature Maximum Pressure Observations made at Max. Temp. and Dryness

Minimum Pressure Observations made at observed at sunrise. observed at 9h. 50m. Apparent Noon. observed at 2h. 40m. observed at 4h. Om.

Sunset.

Barom. 2 Temper.

of the Mry.

28 of the air.

Surface.
Wind
Direction.
Obsd. Ht.
Barom.

of the Mry.

Of the air.

Wind oco i Surface.

Direction.

Barom.
Obsa. Ht.
Temper.
of the Mry.

Surface.

Direction.
Rain Gauge,
Wind

N.

N.

N.

N.

OM.

W.

CM.

W.
N.

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W.

30,296 54, 50, 48, ,356 59, 61, 152,5 n. 1,328 61,766, 57,8 n.,250 64,

,250 63,5 68,5 58,3 N. E.,27063, 64, 57,
,250 84, 46, 44,

N.,256 61, 65,5 55, N. w. 212 63,7 70,5 55,5 N. w.,196 64, 70, 55,3 n. 1,188 65, 69, 55, N.w.
N.

,308 57,762, 52,
,242 51,7 48,5 45,5 n. w. ,300 58, 63, 55, N. E.,228 61, 70, 58,3 w. 1,160 63, 73, 59, w. 1,138 63,7 72, 59,5 cm.,132 63,5 71, 59, CM.
,174,52,5 50,350, N. E.,238 59,366,5 56,3 N. E.,200 62, 172, 39,7 CM. 176 64,5 76, 62, ,150 64,7 74, 61,7 N. 1,148 65, 73, 61,7 N.
1184 55, 52,552, cx. ,250 61, 69, 61, N. E.,216 63, 75,3 64,7 N. E. ,166 65, 78, 65,7| CM.T170 66, 777, 769, N. E.,17066, 75,3 677 N. E.
250 58, 56, 55,5 N. E.,292 64, 74, 66,5 N. 270 65,376, 68, N. E.|210 68,5 | 81, 71,5cm. 1204 69, 78,571,5| N. ,200 68, 75, 72,
,252 58, 56,356,3 CM.,296 64, 71,5 64,3 N. E.,266 66,376, 68, s. w.,188 68, 78,7 68,5 s. w. 166 68,378, 69, ,156 68, 77, 69,5 w.
,200'60, 59, 58, N. E. ,242 65,3 73, 67,3 n. 1,220 67,777, 65,5 s. w.,144 69, 79,5 65,7 w. 1,134 69,5 79, 65, n. w.126 69, 77, 66,
,202 64,5 59, 57,7 w. ,248 66, 70,5 61,5) n. 1,202 69, 76, 161, n. W. ,200 70,5 79,5 65,3 N. w.,148 69,5 78,3 64,5 w.,158 69, 71, 65, CM.
196 59,5 57, 54, ,272 64, 71, 62,5 n. 1,200 67, 76,8 61, w. 1,150 68,5 179, 63, s. w.,142 69, 178, 162,5 w. 1,150 68, 70,363,5 w.
,164 58,5 56, 53, ,216 64, 170,3 60,5 w.,166 66, 75, 62, N. 108 68,8 79, 64,3 s. w.1,084 69,5 77,5 69, N. w.,096 70, 76,5 68,5 N. W.
,070 56,356,755, CM. ,130 64,3 71, 62,7 s.

1,070 68, 79,5 68,8's. w.,046 69,5 82, 70, s. w. ,020 70, 81,5 70, ,036 70, 78,5 69,5 w.
,052 64, 59, 58,7|s. E. ,124 66,5 171,5 65,5 s. w.,100 68,5 77,7 67,3 s.

,012 70, 83, 67,5 s. w. ,998 71, 82, 68,5 1,998 70,

78, 69,3 8. E. ,050 66,5 63,3 62, s. w.

,098 67,3 73, 164,

N. 1,050 70, 79, 64,7 N. w.2018 71,5 81,3 65,3 n. 1,018 71,5 81, 65, N. w.,028 71,7 79, 65,3 cm. ,146 65,300, 156,3 N. E.,21067, 71, 60, N. B. ,164 68, 77, 63,5 n. ,132 69,7 77,7 64, N.w.100 70, 77, 64,3 w. 10669,7 76,564, ,094 60,3 57, 53,7 N.

,150 65, 69, 60,

N. 1,080 67, 77, 166,3 s. w. 020 68,3 78, 66,3 w. ,002 68, 77,5 65, s. w./,002 68,5 76,3 64,3 cm. ,078 64,5 59, 59, ,128 66, 70, 64, N. E.,086 68, 77,5 66, E.

N. 1,056 70,3 75,5 66,5 n.

,052 70,3|79, 67,5 s. w.,050 70, 76, 67
,074 66, 164,758, N. E. ,130 66,5 66, 62, N. E.,088 67,369, 64,3 N. 1,070 67, 66,60,5 n. 1,070 67, 67,5 60,5 N. 1,088 67, 67, 60,
,144 60, 58, 57, N. w.,240 64, 65,760, n.w.202 66,5 72, 61, N. w.,160 68, 74,760, N. w.,152 68,3 75, 63, N. ,150 68, 72,3) 61,3 N.
,250 65, 69, 56,3 n.

N.,168 65,5 74,5 60,7 N. 1.170 66,5 72, 60,51 n. 1,156 66,

,248 65,370, 57, ,188 58,2 55, 50, N. E.

70, 59, 234 57, 52,750 CM.300 62,5 663 58,5N. B. 264 64, 71,5160,3N. B.J,20865, 73, 65, ,186 66, 72,5 66, w. 1,186 65,7 | 70,5 64,

см. ,216 59, 52, 50,3 N. ,262 61,3 65,5 58,

,228.63,571, 160,5 N. E. ,170 64,7 74, 62,5 cm.,168 65, 72,5 62, N. w.,170 65, 71, 62,
,26661,3 68, 57,5 N. E.,250 63, 72,5 61, N. E. 180 65,
,216 55, 53, 52, CM.

75, 63, s. w. 1,170) 65,3 75, 163, w. 1,178 65, 72,5 63,5 w.
,246 55,5 52, 52, N. E.,282 62, 67,5 60,5 N. E.,250 64, 73,5 63,5 N. E.,200 65,5 75, 66, s. w.,200 66, 75, 68, N. E.,200 66, 72,5 68, N. E.
,254 55,5 52,5 52,5 N. E. ,310 63, 70, 61,5 E. 250 64,7 75, 65, 8. E.,182 66,5 77,5 68, N.,188 67, 77, 166,7| w. 1,19067, 75,3 67, CM.
,230 60, 58,5 57,3 N. E. ,278 65,5 74, 68, N. E. ,250 68, 77,5 69, s. 1,182 69, 79, 70, s. 1,180) 69, 75, 69, $. E.,17667,7 68, 55, 6.
,246 60, 59, 56, N. w. ,256 65, 72, 165, N.

,250 66, 173, 65,3 w. 1,146 69, 79, 65,3 N. E.[140 69 | 78,564 5N. B. 170|68,5173,5 64, | CM.
,248 60, 56, 55, CM. 1,294 64,5 71, 62, ,250 66,576, 65, N. 180 67,7 78, 64,5 N. w. 164 68, 76.7 64,7 w. 117468, 175,3 64,
240 59,756,5 56,5 m. ,290 65,

71.3 63,7 n. ,246) 68, 77, 67,5 n. 1,190 69,3 79,5 69,3 w. 1,182 70, 79, 69,7 . E.,196 69,5 77, 68, N. 164 60, 57 56,

,224 65,772,5 63, R, E.,182 69, 79, 67 N. ,120 70,5 80, 67,5 n. 1,708 70,3 79,5 67,

78, 06,5 57,567

,11270, 150 68,578,566,5 ,198 66,5 72,763,

1,088 70,

81,2 68,7 N. ,080 70,2 80,5 67,5 w. ,09270,278,5 69,

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QUARTERLY EXTRACTS

TENDING TO ILLUSTRATE THE OPERATIONS OF THE

British and Foreign Bible Society.

Published by order of the Committee of the
CALCUTTA AUXILIARY BIBLE SOCIETY.

But you

From the Secretary of the Sunday School Society for Ireland.

Dublin, June 8, 1832. I Am instructed by our Committee to appeal again to the liberality of your Society, and to solicit a grant of 3500 Bibles 12mo., 4000 ditto 24mo., and 15,000 Pocket Testaments, for the use of our Society during the present year.

The demands for the Scriptures are much greater than we could satisfy from our own resources, our issues (though guarded by very minute precautions against waste or misapplication) having amounted last year to 32,33l copies, besides 41,283 Spelling Books containing Scripture Extracts. Your kind Christian cooperation, so freely granted, has been therefore essential to the success of our proceedings :-your Committee are entitled, in consequence, to our very grateful acknowledgments. have a far higher reward, in learning (and of this we have sufficient evidence) that you have conduced to the glory of God, and to the best interests of the People of Ireland.

The Schools at our last Annual Meeting amounted to 2611, the Scholars to 202,153, and the gratuitous Teachers to 18,646 : of this number of scholars, 103,729 were reported to be reading in the Bible or Testament; 35,882 being adults above the age of fifteen, and one-half of the entire number (or above 100,000) not receiving instruction in daily schools.

It may interest your Committee if I select a few passages from our Correspondence: they are not solitary instances of beneficial results, but specimens of a mass of testimony in our office to the same effect.

One Correspondent writes to us

It has been a pleasing sight, on my stated visits, to see so many of the grown-up persons of the neighbourhood, who throughout the week were necessarily employed in their daily labours, engage on the Lord's Day with so much readiness in reading the word of God, and manifesting every disposition of getting acquainted with it and treasuring it up in their memories. A considerable number, both of Bibles and Testaments, have at different times been distributed, and the greatest eagerness evinced by all to get copies of them.

Another writes

When we commenced the school, nearly all the children were totally ignorant of the Scriptures : now, those of them who can read have gone

H

over the New Testament several times, and the First Class have been for some time reading the Old.

Another

We occasionally give premiums to the children for good conduct and answering; and, in every case, a Bible is preferred to any thing else we have to cffer.

Another

In visiting the houses of scholars, I find many of them read the word of life at home to their parents; and some of the latter have appeared thankful that they enjoyed this opportunity of hearing it.

Another Conductor of a large school gives us the following extract from a Letter he had received from a young man who had left the school and gone into the Artillery :

I hope the school is increasing in which I was taught to read and understand the Scriptures. I never felt the pleasure of reading the Bible until now. These few weeks I have been thinking of Premium Sunday: when I was at home I rejoiced in that day. My Bible is my comfort; and, with God's help, shall, through life, be my constant guide.

But one other :

Through the kindness of your Society, we have been enabled to introduce the Scriptures into many houses where they never otherwise would have been; and thus our school has been indirectly the means of reaching the Bible, to many an adult who was never within its walls.

There exists throughout the population of this country a very extensive desire to examine into the word of God, and to receive the benefits of Scriptural education ;--- the opposition of the RomanCatholic priesthood to their flocks receiving such, is undiminished, but is becoming, we trust, less effectual ;-and wherever Scriptural education has been fairly tried, and for a sufficient time, there has been observed an improvement in the habits and character of the children, and, in many instances, of their relatives and neighbours.

Ilad our Committee any reason to distrust their former opinion, every fresh erent in the history of this troubled land would convince them that the existing demoralization and misery may be extensively traced to so large a portion of our inhabitants being still ignorant of the sacred scriptures, and un nfluenced by Scriptural principles and rules of conduct; and that the cure for these evils is to be found, under the blessing of God, in the wider diffusion of His word, and of education founded

upon

it.

(From the May Number of The latest Accounts concerning the Kingdom of God," published at Berlin.)

Bagdad, Oct. 1830. Oct. 4-The following is the substance of what I have been able to collect respecting the Jesidis. The main tribe of these people inhabits the mountains of Sindschar. This is a range of mountains extending between Mosul and Merdin, on the western bank of the Tigris; beginning at the distance of a day's journey from Mosul, and continuing as far as Merdin. In the midst of this hilly district, there are, at present, from 5000 to 8000 families of the Jesidis, living scattered in small villages, and independent of the Turks.

“ The number of these Jesidis was formerly much greater than at present; insomuch, that at one time they menaced the cities of Mosul and Merdin with destruction: the Plague however, which for several years raged among them, has swept away a moiety of them.

Besides the Jesidis inhabiting the mountains of Sindschar, there are several villages of this tribe on the banks of the Tigris, in the neighbourhood of Mosul; as well as others in the mountains of Curdistan, who, with some wandering tribes, penetrate with their flocks into the Pashaliks of Wan, Musch, and Bajazid. They are all regarded as arrant robbers; although they are represented as not being so cruel as the Curds, and better disposed towards Christians than towards Mohammedans.

“Their language is Curdish; but they are unacquainted with the arts of reading and writing. They are lleathens, and their religion is probably a remnant of that of the Ancient Parses or Sabæans.

* Oct. 5—I received to-day the news that the caravan by which I sent, a few weeks ago, two cases, containing copies of the Arabic New Testament, to Merdin, had, before it reached Mosul, been attacked and plundered by Arabs. The robbers opened these cases among the rest; but finding that they did not contain treasures of gold, as they had hoped, but merely books, they left them untouched : and thus these identical cases, from their containing divine treasures, reached Mosul in safety, and were afterwards despatched thence to Merdin. The two Syrians who had come hither from Merdin, and returned thither with the books, were, notwithstanding their old and threadbare garments, plundered and robbed of the few paras which we gave them as alms on their journey.

Oct. 15_Since I have visited Mohammedans in the character of a Messenger of Christ, I have frequently had opportunities of witnessing the cheering circumstance, that whenever any one of that nation is induced or has been led by the influence of the Holy Spirit to begin to read the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ devoid of prejudices, and has devoted his attention to its contents, he has been unable to withstand the force of its truths and the power of its divine doctrines; but has been obliged to confess, if not openly, at least silently, that it contains the word of God and the wisdom of God; so that the horrid security into which he has been lulled by the tenets of Islamism has been more or less shaken, as he has contemplated the doctrines of Christianity with more or less earnestness. And although it has not hitherto been our happy lot to behold this hidden seed of the divine word spring up in the hearts of Mohammedans, and become a tree bearing rich fruit, yet the foregoing is a sufficient proof that the truth of the Gospel, and that alone, is, by its internal power, sufficient to overcome the bitter hatred which the Korân has so deeply planted in the breasts of its adherents against Christ and the word of His Cross, to soften and illuminate their hard an.) benighted hearts, and to cause their stubborn reason to yield obedience to the faith. The certainty of this also contains a powerful encouragement to offer the Gospel to the Mehammedans, to distribute it among them, to direct their attention

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