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from his esteemed friend, and he hoped they would all be of one nind, and. agree that there was no other remedy for the wounds and corruptions of mankind but that which was afforded by their common Christianity, (Hear, hear.) He laid a peculiar stress on the word “common," as by it be meant that Christianity by which they were all united-by which the worthy Bislop and himself, and all denominations of Christians were brought together, the Christianity of the Gospel which had no other foundation but which was in Christ Jesus (hear, hear – that Christianity which taught what from his soul he believed, that there was but one remedy for the corruptions of mankind, which was to be found in the love of a crucified Redeemer. (Hear, hear.) The human heart was a dead weight, which could not by its own strength ascend to any thing heavenly or holy; but as the heaviest todies might be raised to any elevation by the application of the lever, the wedge and the pulley, so our hearts might be raised to heaven by applying itself to a Saviour's love. (Hear, hear.) After congratulating the Society on being redeemed from party spirit, than which, he observed, nothing could be more injurious to them as a Society, the speaker contended that their politics ought to be the politics of Christ-the politics of heaven. They should range themselves under Christ, and unfurl the standard of the Jesse's Immortal, who came conquering and to conquer; and while all should hold their own opinion on public subjects, it should be their ruling passion and prevailing desire in connection with the Bible Society to unite in the promotion of simple truth. He supposed that if they went thus far with him, they would not object to go one step farther-that they would agree with him, that there were no means by which Christianity was more promoted than by the circulation of the Holy Scriptures. (Hear, hear.) He rejoiced that they all concurred in the opinion, that all the Scriptures were given by the inspiration of God, and that being so, they might be trusted by themselves, and that they did not require human comment to bestow upon them legitimacy amongst the children of men. (Applause.) He looked upon the Scriptures as authorized means sent by God, and that wherever they sent the Scriptures they sent an appointed testimony to the truth as it was in Jesus ; and how delightful was it to think, that in sending the Scriptures, they were sending an antidote to that infidelity which was poisoning the minds of the children of men. The Scriptures carried within them the proofs of their cwn authencity, and he conceived that it was not possible to read them with a prayerful spirit without being convinced that they were the Word of God. (Hear, hear.) Let them, then, go on wit i the Scriptures and they were safe; but let them go one step beyond the Scriptures, and then what would become of the Society? He should wish to see Christian simplicity prevail among them, as he believed that most harmony would be found within the Christian bounds where there was most simplicity. It reminded him of those words of our Redeemer, “I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent and hast revealel them to bales; even so, Father, for so it seemed good in thy sight.” After pointing out tlie advantages of such a Society as this in the promotion of Christianity, and quoting a remark of the Venerable Bishop of Norwich, that there had not been, since the days of the apostles, a greater institution than the British and Foreign Bible Society, lie went on to observe, that do wonder it should le assailed on all sides--that they should be opposed by open foes, and deserted by former friends--for he always found that in proportion to the excellence of any Christian Institution, was it exposed to such attacks. He then proceeded to make a forcible appeal to those present, particularly the young, to exert themselves in support of the Society; let them be patient in suffering, anxiuus in watching, earnest, and persevering, and immoveable, and firm as a

rock, and notwithstanding the losses of friends, and the diminution of funds, they would have such an array in favour of the British and Foreign Bible Society, as they never had before. (Hear, hear.) Why had they been so successful heretofore ? Because of their strict and uniform adherence to their original and simple principles. On these were founded their union, and their union was their strength. If they had not stood on such sure ground, they would not have distributed 536,000 copies of the Scriptures during the brief and rapid course of the last 12 months. They could not have sent so many mi lions of copies over the whole world. (Hear, hear.) He knew that all their efforts, and their rules, and principles, would have been unavailing without the blessing of Him in whose name they acted, but he also knew that that blessing had come upon the broad, strong, simple, lovely, and harmonious, principles of their Institution. (Hear, hear.) After earnestly hoping that they miglit continue in the same steady course, and feel its advantages more and more from year to year, humbling themselves in the sight of God-divesting themselves of all prejudice, and acting in the spirit of love, and meekness, and forbearance to those who differed from them. The Hon. Gentleman concluded by again urgin; the Meeting to persevere in their support of the Society. (Hear, hear.)

The Resolution was then put and carried.

The Rev. A. BRANDRAM begged to introduce to the notice of the Meeting the Rev. Dr. Cox, of New York, who had visited England as a deputation from the American Bible Society.

Dr. Cox said, that if he were unable to speak, he felt that he could weep for joy. He begged for one moment to disentangle himself from the poetry or the il usion of a scene like that he then beheld. He had slept but one night upon the island of his ancestors, and it was only three weeks this day since he left New York When the commission, to which he felt himself utterly inadequate, was handed to him, it was with grief on many accounts that he received it. He was afraid that he should be unable to reach this country by the first of May, but he embarked on board the ship Samson, and the God of the Nazarite, of the tribe of Dan controlling the winds, had brought him to the British shore sooner than he expected. (Applause.) The solemn agent by which God had strewed Asia and Europe with corpses, visited America, and he was a relic spared by the mercy of God. He feared approuching a scene of so much excitement as the present, lest it should make England his grave. If, however, there were one cause in which he would rather fall a sacrifice than in another, it was in that of the Bible Society. He hoped that when he died it woull be in that cause in which death had chronic.ed and canonized the names that had been read that morning. (Hear, and app'ause.) His nervous debility had increased by hearing of the death of Hill, and he knew that the undulations of that Report would find access to the west of the Miss'ssippi. The statistics of the Daughter Institution he presumed he need not detail. Why should it be that English and American feeling should not be one in that sacred unity so eloquently advertei to by the prece iing speaker ? Whatever might be the prejudices, national or provincial, that existed on either shore, these Societies tended to elicit the unity of the love of Jesus Christ. He was a monarchist in relation to the kingdom of heaven, and he was giad to know that the circle of heavenly light inclu led in one all those who loved the Lord Jesus Christ in sincerity. He looked at the i lea of any other principle taking the lead, as among the dreams of the cloister, and the stupidity if the dark azes. (Cheers.) They night as well undertake the ent-rprize of tunnellin; the Atlantic, and lighting the dark aperture with scintillations of infitel philosophy, as to attempt to foster any other principle. What interest had Englishmen in degrading their own offspring ? from his esteemed friend, and he hoped they would all be of one mind, and, agree that there was no other remedy for the wounds and corruptions of mankind but that which was afforded by their common Christianity, (Hear, hear.) He laid a peculiar stress on the word “common," as by it be meant that Christianity by which they were all united-by which the worthy Bishop and himself, and all denominations of Christians were brought together, the Christianity of the Gospel which had no other foundation but which was in Christ Jesus (hear, hear— that Christianity which taught whai from his soul he believed, that there was but one remedy for the corruptions of mankind, which was to be found in the love of a crucified Redeemer. (Hear, hear.) The human heart was a dead weight, which could not by its own strength ascend to any thing heavenly or holy; but as the heaviest todies might be raised to any elevation by the application of the lever, the wedge and the pulley, so our hearts might be raised to heaven by applyinz itself to a Saviour's love. (Hear, hear.) After congratulating the Society on being redeemed from party spirit, than which, he observed, nothing could be more injurious to them as a Society, the speaker contended that their politics ought to be the politics of Christ, the politics of heaven. They should range themselves under Christ, and unfurl the standard of the Jese's Inmortal, who came conquering and to conquer; and while all should hold their own opinion on public subjects, it should be their ruling passion and prevailing desire in connection with the Bible Society to unite in the promotion of simple truth. He supposed that if they went thus far with him, they would not object to go one step farther-that they would agree with him, that there were no means by which Christianity was more promoted than by the circulation of the Holy Scriptures. (Hear, hear.) He rejoiced that they all concurred in the opinion, that all the Scriptures were given by the inspiration of God, and that being so, they ght be trusted by themselves, and that they did not require human comment to bestow upon them legitimacy amongst the children of men. (Applause.) He looked upon the Scriptures as authorized means sent by God, and that wherever they sent the Scriptures they sent an appointed testimony to the truth as it was in Jesus ; and how delightful was it to think, that in sending the Scriptures, they were sending an antidote to that infidelity which was poisoning the minds of the children of men. The Scriptures carried within them the proofs of their own authencity, and be conceived that it was not possible to read them with a prayerful spirit without being convinced that they were the Word of God. (Hear, hear.) Let them, then, go on wit the Scriptures and they were safe ; but let them go one step beyond the Scriptures, and then what would become of the Society? He should wish to see Christian simplicity prevail among them, as he believed that most harmony would be found within the Christian bounds where there was most simplicity. It reminded him of those words of our Redeemer, “I thank thee, O Father, Lord of leaven and earth, that thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent and hast reveale l them to bales; even so, Father, for so it seemed good in thy sight.” After pointing out the advantages of such a Society as this in the promotion of Christianity, and quoting a remark of the Veneralle Bishop of Norwich, that there had not been, since the days of the apostles, a greater institution than the British and Foreign Bible Society, le went on to observe, that do wonder it should le assailed on all sides-that they should be opposed by cpen foes, and deserted by former friends--for he always found that in proportion to the excellence of any Christian Institution, was it exposed to such attacks. He then proceeded to make a forcible appeal to those present, particularly the young, to exert themselves in support of the Society; let them be patient in suffering, auxivus in watching, earnest, and persevering, and immoveable, and firm as a

rock, and notwithstanding the losses of friends, and the diminution of funds, they would have such an array in favour of the British and Foreign Bible Society, as they never had before. (Hear, hear.) Why had they been so si!ccessful heretofore? Because of their strict and uniform adherence to their original and simple principles. On these were founded their union, and their union was their strength. If they had not stood on such sure ground, they would not have distributed 536,000 copies of the Seriptures during the brief and rapid course of the last 12 months. They could not have sent so many mi lions of copies over the whole world. (Hear, hear.) He knew that all their efforts, and their rules, and principles, would have been unavailing without the blessing of Him in whose name they acted, but he also knew that that blessing had come upon the broad, strong, simple, lovely, and harmonious, principles of their Institution. (Hear, hear.)

After earnestly hoping that they might continue in the same steady course, and feel its advantages more and more from year to year, humbling themselves in the sight of Gol-divesting themselves of all prejudice, and acting in the spirit of love, and meekness, and forbearance to those who differed from them. The Hon. Gentleman concluded by again urgin; the Meeting to persevere in their support of the Society. (Hear, hear.)

The Resolution was then put and carried.

The Rev. A. BRANDRAM begged to introduce to the notice of the Meeting the Rev. Dr. Cox, of New York, who had visited England as a deputation from the American Bible Society.

Dr. Cox said, that if he were unable to speak, he felt that he could weep for joy. He begged for one moment to disentangle himself from the poetry or the illusion of a scene like that he then beheld. He had slept but one night upon the island of his ancestors, and it was only three weeks this day since he left New York When the commission, to which he felt himself utterly inadequate, was handed to him, it was with grief on many accounts that he received it. He was afraid that he should be unable to reach this country by the first of May, but he embarked on board the ship Samson, ani the God of the Nazarite. of the tribe of Dan controlling the winds, had brought him to the British shore sooner than he expected. (Applause.) The solemn agent by which God had strewed Asia and Europe with corpses, visite) America, and he was a relic spared by the mercy of God. He feared approcching a scene of so much excitement as the present, lest it should make Englant his grave. If, however, there were one cause in which he would rather fall a sacrifice than in another, it was in that of the Bible Society. He hoped that when he diet it woull be in that cause in which death had chronic.ed and canonized the names that had been read that morning. (Hear, and app'ause.) His nervous debility had increased by hearing of the death of Hill, and he knew that the undulations of that Report would find access to the west of the Miss'ssippi. The statistics of the Daughter Institution be presume i he need not detail. Why should it be that English and American feeling should not be one in that sacred unity so eloquently adverte to by the prece ling speaker? Whatever might be the prejudices, national or provincial, that existed on either shore, these Societies tended to elicit the unity of the love of Jesus Christ.

He was

a monarchist in relation to the kinglom of heaven, and he was glad to know that the circle of heavenly light inclu led in one all those who loved the Lord Jesus Christ in sincerity. He looked at the i lea of any other principle taking the leil, as among the dreams of the cloister, and the stupidity of the dark ares. (Cheers.) They inight as well undertake the ent sprize of tunnellin; the Atlantic, and lighting the dark aperture with sintilations of infi lel philosophy, as to attempt to foster any other principle. What interest bad Englishmen in degrading their own offspring ? from his esteemed friend, and he hoped they would all be of one mind, and. agree that there was no other remedy for the wounds and corruptions of markind b'it that which was afforded by their common Christianity, (Hear, hear.) He luid a peruiar stress on the word common," as by it be meant that Christianity by which they were all united-by which the worthy Bislop and himself, and all denominations of Christians were brought together, the Christianity of the Gospel which had no other foundation but which was in Christ Jesus (hear, hear – that Christianity which taught wliai from his soul he believed, that there was but one remedy for the corruptions of mankind, wh'ch was to be found in the love of a crucified Redeeme:. (Hear, hear.) The human heart was a dead weight, which could not by its own strength ascend to any thing heavenly or holy; but as the heaviest todies might be raised to any elevation by the application of the lever, the wedge and the pulley, so our hearts might be raised to heaven by applying itself to a Saviour's love. (Hear, hear.) After congratulating the Society on being redeemed from party spirit, than which, he observed, nothing could be more injurious to them as a Society, the speaker contended that their politics ought to be the politics of Christ, the politics of heaven. They should range themselves under Christ, and unfurl the standard of the Jesse's Inmortal, who came conquering and to conquer; and while all shou:d lold their own opinion on public subjects, it should be their ruling pission and prevailing desire in connection with the Bible Society to unite in the promotion of simple truth. He supposed that if they went thus far with him, they would not object to go one step farther-that they would agree with him, that there were no means by which Christianity was more promoted than by the circulation of the Holy Scriptures. (Hear, hear.) He rejoiced that they all concurred in the opinion, that all the Scriptures were given by the inspiration of God, and that being so, they might be trusted themselves, and that they did not require human comment to bestow upen them legitimacy amongst the children of men. (Applause.) He looked upon the Scriptures as authorized means sent by God, and that wherever they sent the Scriptures they sent an appointed testimony to the truth as it was in Jesus; and how delightful was it to think, that in sending the Scriptures, they were sending an antidote to that infidelity which was poisoning the minds of the children of men. The Scriptures carried within them the proofs of their own autheneity, and he conceived that it was not possible to read them with a prayerful spirit without being convinced that they were the Word of God. (Hear, hear.) Let them, then, go on wit i the Scriptures and they were safe ; but let them go one step beyond the Scriptures, and then what would become of the Society? He should wish to see Christian simplicity prevail among them, as he believed that most harmony would be found within the Christian bounds where there was most simplicity. It reminded him of those words of our Redeemer, “I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou last hid these things from the wise and prudent and last revealel them to bales; even so, Father, for so it seemed good in thy sight.” After pointing out the advantages of such a Society as this in the promotion of Christianity, and queting a remark of the Venerable Bishop of Norwich, that there had not been, since the days of the apostles, a greater institution than the British and Foreigu Bibie Society, he went on to observe, that do wonder it should be assailed on all sides-that they should be opposed by open fues, and deserted by former friends—for he always found that in proportion to the excellence of any Christian Institution, was it exposed to such attacks. He then proceeded to make a forcible appeal to those present, particularly the youny, to exert themselves in support of the Society; let them be patient in suffering, auxivus in watching, earnest, and persevering, and immoveable, and firm as a

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