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5. The English Bark Jean Graham, J. Dunscombe, from London 22nd March.

The Brig Thomas Dougall, R. Brown, from Mauritius 7th July.
The Bark Skinner, J. Ř. Gillon, Akyab 4tb June, and Basin 18th July.
The Dutch Barque Deidericka, from Batavia (date pot mentioned).

Passenger :-Mrs. Bell.
7. The Bark Clarinda, J. Antram, from London.
9. The Bark Memnon, R. H. Aikin, from Liverpool 22nd March.

Ship Princess Victoria, J. Hart, from Liverpool 23rd March. 12. Ship Hall, J. Hughes, from Liverpool 23rd Feb. and Bombay 22nd July.

Ship Elizabeth, R. W. Blenkinsop, from Bombay 21st July. 13. F. Ship Cinq Freres,-Ytier, from Marseilles 24th Jan. and Bourbon 4th May.

Passengers from Bourbon. - E. Rossollin, and C. J. Luvecat, Esqs. Merchants.
Ship Margaret, W. Johns, returned from sea leaky.

Passengers ;-Mrs. Bolton and children ; Mrs. Dundas; Miss Broughton, and Lieut. Dundas.

16. Ship Lady Kennaway, L. W. Moncrief, from London 22nd April, and Madras 8th August.

Passengers.-Mrs. Chambers and child; Miss Orton, Rev. Mr. R. Chambers, Mr. N. C. McLeod, Cadet, and Mr. Dixon.

17. Ship Loujee Family, J. H. Johnston, from Bombay 31st July.

19. French Ship L'Courier de St. Pérre, F. Besque, from Nantz and Pondicherry (date not mentioned).

Bark Capricorn, R. Smith, from Liverpool 23rd January, Cape of Good Hope and Colombo (date not mentioned), and St. Pedro 8th August. 21. Brig Joanna, R. Paterson, from Greenock 22nd April.

Bark Egyptian, W. Lilburn, from Bombay 31st July.

Schooner Mary, Thos. Daniel, from Rangoon 6th August. 23. American Ship Lion, J. Rick, from Boston 15th May.

Bark Swallow, W. Adam, from Rangoon 13th August.

Passengers :-- Captain G. Burney, 38th N. I., W. Spiers, and W. Roy, Esquires, Merchants. 1 Havildar, I Naik, and 8 Seapoys, 38th Regt. N. I.

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DEPARTURES.
4. Ship Cavendish Bentinck, R. A. J. Roe, for Bombay.

Ship Indian Oak, E. Worthington, for Mauritius.
Brig Onyx, Wm. Chamber, for Mauritius.
The Brig Ripley, R. Lloyd, for Liverpool.
The Bark Bahamian, J. Pearce, for Mauritius and Liverpool.

The Bark Renown, G. McLeod, for Mauritius. 7. Bark Fifeshire, R. Allport, for China.

Passengers for China :-Mrs. Allport and children. For Singapore :-McKay, Esq. Captain Welland. For Penang :-Mrs. Bristow; Major Bristow.

Ship Robert, H. Blyth, for Liverpool.

Passengers for London.-J. Wilkinson, Esq.; W.J. Dry, Esq. and J. Somerville, Esq. 8. Bark Judith, W. Ager, for Mauritius.

Brig Industry, A. Corubes, for Mauritius.

Passenger per Industry, for Isle of France.-Mr. Underwood, Civil Service. 9. Brig Galatea, W. Tayte, for Mauritius.

Ship Hydross, P. D. Trezevant, for Bombay. 10. General Gascoyne, J. Fisher, for Madras. 11. Bark Will Watch, William Barrington, for Penang and Singapore. 16. Ship William Wilson, J. H. Miller, for Port Louis and Mauritius.

Bark Falcon, D. Ovenstone, for China.

Bark Research, A. Ogilvie, for Madras. 17. Bark Sylph, R. Wallace, for China. 20. French Ship Laseine La Marie, for Havre de Grace.

Bark Clarinda, J. Antram, for Mauritius. 21. Ship Arab, T. S. Sparkes, for London.

Passengers:-Captain Hicks, late of the Lord Amherst, and W. H. Tincler, Esq.
Ship Imogen, J. Richardson, for Mauritius.
French Ship Velocitere, A. Roudeu, for Bourbon.

Schooner Dalla Merchant, W. Allen, for Rangoon.
22. Brig Thetis, W. Boothby, for Madras.
23. Brig Nelson Wood, S. Ball, for Mauritius.

Meteorological Register, kept at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, for the Month of July, 1833. Minimum Temperature Maximum Pressure Observations made at Max. Temp. and Dryness Minimum Pressure Observations made at observed at Sunrise. observed at 9h. 50m. Apparent Noon. observed at 2h. 40in. observed at 4h. Om.

Sunset.

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the Mercury.

Wind.
Direction.
Obsd. At.
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the Mercury

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El the Mercury

Rain, Old Gauge.

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129,706 81,6 80,2 80, S. E. ,742 85, 85,8 81,4 s. w. ,748 84,4 83,1 81,6 s. w.,670 85, 89,285,2 s. 1,650 86,8 91,2 87, s. w.,646 85,8 87,3 85, s. e. 0,74 0,65

,648 83, 82,4 80,7 s. ,676 85,6 87,5 84,3 s. ,674 86,9 91,8 86,7 s. w.,620 87,7 92, 87,51 s. 1,600) 88,4 90,5 86,7 s. 1,618 86, 86,5/84,3 s.
,702 81,9 | 80,8 80,1 ,734 84,7 84,8 82,6 s ,71685,8 88, 85, ,676 86,2 88,2 86,6 s. E1,650 86,3 87,7 85,7 s. E. ,656 84,1 84,6 83,8 s. 10,25 0,20

,694 80,8 | 80,3 80, S. E. ,72882,5 82, 81,7 E. ,718 82,8 81,4 80,5 s. ,676 82,9 81,3 80,3 s. E' ,650 83,8 83,5 81,8 s. e. ,784 79, 75, 76,3 sts w 0,92 0,86
5 ,682 78,3 / 78,5 77,9 E. ,710/82, 83,5 81, E. ,702 83,3 83,7 83, s. E. ,656 85,5 85,6 84,3 4. E. ,618 85, 86,8 85,6 s. e. ,634 82,9 83,183,3 s. e. 0,56 0,47
6 ,672 82,1 81,6 80,8 E. ,724 85, 86,4 85, N. E. ,692 85,0 88,3 86,4 N. E.),670 | 85, 85,2 84, E. 1,654 84,183,9 83,1 E. ,682 82, 81,5 81,2E.
,684 82,3 80,7 80,6 E. 796 84,5 85,9 84,2 N. E. ,754 85,1) 87,8 85,5 N. E, |,732 | 85, 85,9 84,8 N. E. ,714 84, 84,5 84,7 N. E. ,732 82,1 81, 80,6 E.

786 84, 85,3 84,2 s. E. ,752 85,5 88,3 86, s. e. ,706 86,5 89,9 87,5 s. E.,684 86,8 90, 87,3 s. E. ,692 86, 86,1 85,4 s. E. 0,15 0,13
,714 81,5 81,3 81, s. E.674 85,5 87, 85, 8. E. ,694 86,3 89, 87, s. E. ,630 | 87,4 92,1 89, E. 1,608 87,1 90,2 88,6 N. E.,602 86,6 87,2 87, s. E.
10 ,722 81,7 81,6 81,2 S. B. 682 86,3 87,485,8 E. ,666 87,2 88,9 87,4 E. ,630 88,392,4 88,8 s. E. ,614 89,1 92,2 89,5 N. E.1,624 85,6 83,7 82,9 E.
11 ,710 83,4 81,9, 81,5 E. 694 86,6 90,2 87,3 E. ,680 87,3 91,788,4 E. 1,638 87, 88,1 86,2 N. E.,620 86,9 87, 86, n. e. ,638 86,7 85,8 84,7 N. E. 0,52 0,48
12 ,698 83,9 82,5 81,8 N. B. 704 86, 86, 84,2 N. E.,670 85,6 85, 84, N. E. ,626 85,2 81,2 83,3 N. E. ,604 85,5 81,9 84,1 s. ,620 84,1 82,5 81,8 E. 0,52 0,45
13 ,626 83,3/81,9 81,6 E. 654 81,8 84,9 83,5 N E.,638 85, 85,4 83,5 N. E. ,606 84,7 83,8 82,8 N. E. ,588 85,185, 84, S. E.,602 84, 82,6 81,9 s. E. 0,18 0,18
14 ,652 82,980,6 80,4 s. e. '690 83,5 82,5 82,2 E. ,644 84,7 85, 83,5 s. E. ,612 84,7 85, 84, s. E.,628 84, 84,683,8s, e.,652 84,1 83, 83,2 s. E. 1,34 1,16
15 ,664 83,3 80,7 81, s. B.[700 84, 82,9 82,7 s. E.,680 85, 85,3 84,8 s. E. ,634 85,5 86,8 85,2 s. e.,650 85, 85,2, 83,9 s. E.,658 84,2 82,6 82,1 s. E. 0,38 0,30
16

,676 83,5 82, 80,7 S. E.) 718 84,1 84,3 82,2 s. B. ,694 85,5 87,6 84,5 s. B. ,670 83,4 81,2 81, ,642 83,7 82,780,6 E. 1,646 84,3 83,4 81,4 E.
17 ,692 82,980,680, 734 84, 85,9 82, 8. E.1,720 85,4 87,6 84,3's. E.,676 85,7 88,1 85, s. e.,658 85,5 87,5 84,6 8. E.,678 85, 83,8 83,2 8. 12,10 1,93
18 ,708 83,2 82,5 82, 746 84,383,1 82,2 s. ,700 84,5 83,5 82,5) s. ,662 84,3 83, 82,3 s. E.,646 84,6 83,6 82,8 8. 1,668 83,4 82,882,3s.
19 ,696 81,9 (79,8|79,9 s. 732 83, 81,2 80,6 s. w. ,716 82,2 80,3 80,1 s. w. ,684 82,7 81,6 80,3 s. w.,652 83,3 81,7 80,8 s. w..676 82,6 81, 80,6 9. E. 1,54 1,30
20 ,704 82,9 82, 81,7 s. w. '748 84,2 85,2 83,9 s. w.,730 84, 82,5 82, s. w.,678 84, 83,3 81,7 s. w. ,676 81,3 84,5 82,5 s. w.,694 83,8 83,7 82,4 8.
21 ,686 81,5 79,579, '710 82, 81,6 81,2 s. ,692 82,8 82,381,71 8. ,666 / 84,386, 84,2] s. ,652 84,7 86,2 84, s. E.I.680 83,9 83,882,8's. E. 2,14 1,97
22 ,678 81,979, 79, s. E. 726 83,2 84,8 82, 1,710 84, 86,2 83,9 N. B. ,654 85,2 88,2 86,31 E. ,638 85,388, 85,2 E. 650 83,8 83, 82,5 E. 0,10 0,10
23 ,736 81,5 80, 80, N. E. 722 84, 85,5 83,1 E. ,720 84, 85, 82,6 N. E.,668 86,2 90,5 85,9N. E. ,656 86,6 89,1 84,7| E. 672 84,2 84, 83,1's. E.
24 ,698 81,680,1 80,1 E. '740 84,8 86,2 84,8 E. ,692 85,1 86,5 84,5 B. 1,670 83,2 83,7 83,8| E. ,652 86, 89, 86,3 s. E. 674 84,8 84,4 83,5 8. E. 0,08 0,06
25 ,694 81,7 80,6 80,3 s. E.l.740 84,1 85, 83,7 E. ,718 85,2 89, 85,6s. E|,664 86, 86,4 86,2 E. ,654 85,2 85, 83,8 s. E.V.660 84,6 83,4 83,2 s. E. 0,60 0,50
26 ,698 81,980,9 79,5 N. B. 728 84,7 86, 84,2's. E.,692 85,8 87,5 86, |,662 85,7 86,4 85,38. E. ,618 85,7 86,286, s. e.,652 85,2 85,8 84,7's. E. 0,06 0,06
27 ,656 81,5 80, 79,4 s. e. 710 85,4 87,2 86,2 s. E.,676 86,389,2 86,9 s. E ,640 87, 90, 86,5 s. E.,620 87, 89,4 86,3 s. 626 85,8 86,383,2 s. E. 0,86 0,70
28 ,668 82,1 81,379,7| 8. 706 86, 87,5 85,8 6. 1,688 87, 91, 87,3 s. ,652 86,7 88,3 86, 8. E1,620 86,4 87,5 85,2 S. K. 628 84,183, 82,6 %.
29 ,604 82,4 81,681, w. 1,652 86, 89,2 87, 8. w.,622 87,492, 88,2 #. 1,600 87,4 88, 87, 2 s. E. ,648 84, 81,8 81,6 N. E. 550 84,382,5 82, S. E.
30 ,632 83,5 82,3 81,9 N. B.V,646 86, 88,1 84,8 N. E.1,618 87,2 90,8 86,2 N. B.1,668 84,3 82,3 81,5 N. E. 556 84,2 82,7 81,6 R. (576 84, 82, 81,2 kg
31,678 80,979,779,7 s. e.\,620 83,3 81,2 80,6' . B.1,620 83,782,7|81,1le. K.,672 | 83,9 84,1 81,8/s. 2.1,694 81, 182,5 89, 01081,3|79,979,7VAR.

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THE

CALCUTTA CHRISTIAN OBSERVER.

October, 1833.

1.-Memoir of the late Rev. R. Burn, Chaplain at Singapore.

In our March No. we announced to our readers the death of the Rev. Robert Burn, H. C. Chaplain at Singapore, and we are now about to gratify them with a somewhat more extended account of this excellent individual, whose ardent piety, holy zeal, and remarkable liberality of spirit, render him an example worthy of universal imitation. We have been favored with a few particulars regarding him by one who possessed an excellent opportunity of becoming acquainted with his peculiar virtues, and from our correspondent's narrative we purpose extracting such information as we believe cannot fail to gratify all who may peruse it.

In exhibiting our departed friend and brother to the eye of the religious public, we would desire to bear in mind, that in honoring him we promote the glory of that God by whose grace he became worthy of honor; and while we essay to delineate the lovely traits that grace produced, we would breathe our earnest prayer that it may be to the profit of many, that they may be saved.”

The Rev. ROBERT Burn was born about the year 1798, and enjoyed the privilege of owing his existence to parents who were faithful servants of God, and who aimed to impress on the minds of their offspring that truth which themselves had experienced to be“ the power of God unto salvation.” His father, Major-General Burn, well known to the religious world by some little practical works of which he was the author, as well as by an interesting memoir of him, which has been widely circulated, was a man of a very amiable, humble, and pious spirit, and of strong faith, which from the station that he occupied was necessarily often put to the test. The benefits derived from his example and instructions are seen in his posterity, for of a numerous family left behind him, almost all, we believe, are walking in the way of piety. One son, of a lovely disposition and exemplary piety, who had devoted himself to the work of God among the heathen of India, preceded his brother to his reward, ere he had been permitted to embark on his honorable enterprize; and another, the Rev. Andrew Burn, continues yet a pilgrim, to mourn with six affectionate sisters the irreparable loss they have sustained. His pious mother too awaited his happy entrance into the everlasting kingdom, having been removed from the bosom of her family to that of her much loved Lord a few years since.

The covenant faithfulness of Jehovah, so remarkably displayed with regard to this interesting family, will, we trust, serve as an additional encouragement to the parents of a numerous offspring in their efforts to lead them into the narrow road; while it may impart some rays of comfort to godly fathers and mothers, mourning over reprobate, or at least unhopeful children, as will appear more evidently in the course of our narrative.

We know little of Mr. Burn's first years : he has been heard to speak of himself as an exceedingly passionate child, and one who often gave pain to his parents by the violence of his temper; and from the remarkable warmth of his character in after life, we should be inclined to give full credence to such an account. The grace of God, however, which brings salvation, quickly teaches the renewed soul to deny such tempers, and ornaments its possessors with a meek and quiet spirit: and for this Robert Burn became afterwards as distinguished as ever he might have been for its opposite ; for truly may it be said of him, that he suffered long and was kind, and whatsoever things were lovely and of good report, on these he thought and these he practised too.

His first religious impressions are, we believe, to be traced to an interview held with his father when on his dying bed. He was then in his 15th year; an age perhaps peculiarly favorable for deep religious feelings, as it unites much of the tenderness of a youthful spirit with somewhat of the decision and firmness of manhood. On approaching his dying parent, his hand was grasped, and the eyes of his beloved relative, which were so_soon to close to the scenes of mortality, were uplifted to heaven; while the voice, which in a little while would cease to be heard among the sounds of the earth, earnestly supplicated the grace of God to change the heart of a son, concerning whom he felt a more than common anxiety. When his prayer was ended, he could only add, “ My dear boy, I have prayed for you, that you may become a child of God.” The divine Spirit carried home this simple sentence; Robert's susceptible heart was touched, and from that day he sought and served his father's God. A little incident that occurred some time after this may here be mentioned, as tending to illustrate the natural shyness of his character, as well as the spirit of genuine piety which pervaded the whole family. One of the elder sisters had instituted a prayer-meeting, in which the others joined ; and she often urged her brother Robert to meet amongst

them, and take his turn in leading the devotions of their little assembly. After a while, he consented, though reluctantly, to comply with her request ; but when his turn came, though he began, he soon faltered, and at length stopped. His sister upon this took up the words, as it were, from her brother’s lips, and continued his prayer in such an affectionate and fervent strain, as deeply affected and effectually won his heart, and from that moment he who afterwards became a wrestling Israel learnt to pray.

We are not acquainted with the particular causes that induced him to enter the ministry: doubtless they were such as commended themselves to his tender conscience, and such as his friends would approve did they know them. He studied at Oxford, from whence, after taking his bachelor's degree, he removed to a country parish, of which, after his ordination, he became the curate. During the short period he continued in this situation, he met with many pleasing instances of encouragement; and he was wont to look back upon the days he spent among the poor, humble, unsophisticated people, who were then his spiritual charge, as among the happiest of his life. There I was at home in every sense of the word,” he would often say," while here I meet with nothing to cheer me, and sometimes I think I have thrust myself uncalled into the sacred office I sustain.” To others however his fitness for the work of an evangelist was so evident, that they were never left in doubt; and his first appointment as a chaplain came to him so evidently unsought and providentially, as induced his mother, who leaned on him as her chief earthly prop, and his relations, who loved him with an intensity of affection that almost tore their hearts asunder as they gave him up, to say “go," while it evidently proved to all that he was called of the Lord to labor in this distant part of the vineyard. In addition to this, if additional proof be required, we may remark, that the valuable service he has rendered to the cause of missions, both by his influence, his purse, his pen, and his personal efforts, make such a conclusion inevitable. To short-sighted beings like ourselves, who can scarcely judge correctly of passing events, much less enter into the future

into the future consequences of present steps, it is only possible to form correct conclusions from apparent results; and while those who humbly rest on the divine promise may be assured, that if they acknowledge God in all their ways, he will direct their steps, they must often remain for a season in darkness.

Mr. Burn first arrived at Bencoolen in Sumatra, in 1824, and continued there till 1825, when the settlement was evacuated by the English. He was then appointed to Singapore, but was detained on his way there to officiate in the absence of the late Mr. Hutchings, who was chaplain at Penang. He reached his final destination in 1826, and from that period to the close of his

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