Tales from American History, Band 1

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J. & J. Harper, 1833
 

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Seite 162 - All in a hot and copper sky, The bloody Sun, at noon, Right up above the mast did stand, No bigger than the Moon. Day after day, day after day, We stuck, nor breath nor motion; As idle as a painted ship Upon a painted ocean.
Seite 228 - ... the old world in magnitude, and separated by two vast oceans from all the earth hitherto known by civilized man! And how would his magnanimous spirit have been consoled, amidst the afflictions of age and the cares of penury, the neglect of a fickle public, and the injustice of an ungrateful king, could he have anticipated the splendid empires which were to spread over the beautiful world he had discovered; and the nations, and tongues, and languages which were to fill its lands with his renown,...
Seite 48 - ... or vesper hymn to the Virgin, he made an impressive address to his crew. He pointed out the goodness of God in thus conducting them by soft and favoring breezes across a tranquil ocean, cheering their hopes continually with fresh signs, increasing as their fears augmented, and thus leading and guiding them to a promised land.
Seite 153 - The pleasant life of the island was at an end,; the dream in the shade by day; the slumber during the sultry noontide heat by the fountain or the stream, or under the spreading...
Seite 49 - By the time the latter had ascended the roundhouse the light had disappeared. They saw it once or twice afterwards in sudden and passing gleams, as if it were a torch in the bark of a fisherman, rising and sinking with the waves, or in the hand of some person on shore, borne up and down as he walked from house to house. So transient and uncertain were these gleams that few attached any importance to them. Columbus, however, considered them as certain signs of land, and, moreover, that the land was...
Seite 66 - True it is, that after they felt confidence, and lost their fear of us, they were so liberal with what they possessed, that it would not be believed by those who had not seen it. If anything was asked of them, they never said no, but rather gave it cheerfully, and showed as much amity as if they gave their very hearts...
Seite 133 - THE groves were God's first temples. Ere man learned To hew the shaft, and lay the architrave, And spread the roof above them — ere he framed The lofty vault, to gather and roll back The sound of anthems ; in the darkling wood, Amid the cool and silence, he knelt down, And offered to the Mightiest solemn thanks And supplication.
Seite 50 - There — in the west ! and now, alas, 'tis gone ! — 'Twas all a dream ! we gaze and gaze in vain ! But mark and speak not, there it comes again ! It moves ! — what form unseen, what being there With torch-like lustre fires the murky air ? His instincts, passions, say, how like our own ! O, when will day reveal a world unknown...
Seite 190 - their majesties commanded me by letter to submit to whatever Bobadilla should order in their name ; by their authority he has put upon me these chains, I will wear them until they shall order them to be taken off, and I will preserve them afterwards as relics and memorials of the reward of my services...
Seite 228 - What visions of glory would have broke upon his mind could he have known that he had indeed discovered a new continent, equal to the whole of the old world in magnitude, and separated by two vast oceans from all the earth hitherto known by civilized man...

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