The Life of Mr. Thomas Betterton, the Late Eminent Tragedian. Wherein the Action and Utterance of the Stage, Bar, and Pulpit, are Distinctly Consider'd. ... To which is Added, The Amorous Widow, ... Written by Mr. Betterton. ...

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Robert Gosling, 1710 - 87 Seiten

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Seite 119 - Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil, that men do, lives after them ; The good is oft interred with their bones ; So let it be with Caesar.
Seite 115 - Hear, Nature, hear ! dear goddess, hear ! Suspend thy purpose, if thou didst intend To make this creature fruitful ! Into her womb convey sterility ! Dry up in her the organs of increase, And from her derogate body never spring A babe to honour her ! If she must teem...
Seite 82 - Herod. Pray you, avoid it. Be not too tame, neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor; suit the action to the word, the word to the action; with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature...
Seite 116 - Make me to see't; or, at the least, so prove it, That the probation bear no hinge nor loop To hang a doubt on ; or woe upon thy life ! lago.
Seite 24 - Oh ! it offends me to the foul, to hear a robufteous periwig-pated fellow tear a paffion to tatters, to very rags, to fplit the ears of the groundlings ; who (for the moft part) are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb fhews and neife : I could have fuch a fellow whipp'd for o'erdoing termagant ; it out-herods Herod. Pray you, avoid it.
Seite 16 - Practice to confult e'en the moft indifferent Poet in any Part we have thought fit to accept of...
Seite 70 - A broken voice, and his whole function suiting With forms to his conceit? and all for nothing! For Hecuba! What's Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba, That he should weep for her...
Seite 9 - ... apiece for every day there shall be any playing at the King's Theatre. Mr. Hart and Mr. Kynaston do both also promise to promote with all their power and interest an agreement between both playhouses : and Mr. Kynaston for himself promises to endeavour as much as he can to get free that he may act at the Duke's Playhouse, but he is not obliged to play unless he have ten shillings per day allowed for his acting and his pension then to cease. Mr. Hart and Mr. Kynaston promise to go to law with...
Seite xiii - What he has been, though present praise be dumb, Shall haply be a Theme in times to come, As now we talk of RosciUS, and of Rome. Had you with-held your favours on this night, Old Shakespear's Ghost had ris'n to do him right.
Seite 17 - ... some rules, by which the young beginners might direct themselves to that perfection, which everybody is sensible is extremely (and perhaps always has been) wanted on our stage I wish I could prevail with you to deliver your sentiments on this head, so that from them we might form a system of acting, which might be a rule to future players and teach them to excel not only themselves, but those who have gone before them.

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