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Stanzas to the Memory of the Spanish Patriots latest

killed in resisting the Regency and the Duke of Angou-

lême........

...........188

Song of the Greeks...................................185

Ode to Winter........................................188

Lines spoken by Mrs. Bartley at Drury-Lane Theatre, on

the first opening of the House after the Death of the

Princess Charlotte, 1817................ ............190

Lines on the Grave of a Suicide.......... ...........193

Reallura. ......

The Turkish Lady.....................

.202

The Brave Roland. .........

.204

The Spectre Boat: a Ballad................

The Lover to his Mistress on her Birth-Day.............208

Song—" Oh, how hard”..............................209

Adelgitha............................................210

Lines on receiving a Seal with the Campbell Crest, from

K. M—, before her Marriage. ........

..........211

Gilderoy..........

.....213

Stanzas on the threatened Invasion, 1803........ .215

The Ritter Bann.........

Song—“Men of England”............

.......................225

.225

Song—" Drink ye to her”......

.226

The Harper, .......... ...........

The Wounded Hussar.........

.228

Love and Madness: an Elegy.......

.230

Hallowed Ground.........

.234

Song—“Withdraw not yet”...........

Caroline.- Part I..................

.239

Part II. To the Evening Star

.241

The Beech Tree's Petition..........

.243

Field Flowers.......

.244

Song—" To the Evening Star”.......

.246

Stanzas to Painting.......

The Maid's Remonstrance. .........

......250

Absence, ,.,,,,,...............................

....251

Lines inscribed on the Monument erected by the Widow

of Admiral Sir G. Campbell, K.C.B., to the memory of

her Husband...

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Stanzas on the Battle of Navarino.........

.253

Lines on revisiting a Scottish River.............. .255

The “ Name Unknown;" in imitation of Klopstock

Farewell to Love...................

Lines on the Camp Hill, near Hastings. ............... .260

Lines on Poland. ........

.262

A Thought suggested by the New Year.

269

Song—“How delicious is the winning".

.270

Margaret and Dora. ........

...271

The Power of Russia. .........

Lines on leaving a Scene in Bavaria.............

The Death-Boat of Heligoland.....................

Song—“When Love came first to Earth”............ 286

Song—“Earl March looked on his Dying Child”......

...287

Song—“When Napoleon was flying”..................288

Lines to Julia M— , sent with a copy of the Author's

Poems.........

............289

Drinking Song of Munich.......

................290

Lines on the Departure of Emigrants for New South Wales.291

Lines on revisiting Cathcart....

.............296

The Cherubs.-Suggested by an Apologue in the Works

of Franklin......

...........297

Senex's Soliloquy on his youthful Idol.................301

To Sir Francis Burdett, on his Speech delivered in Par-

liament, August 7, 1832, respecting the Foreign Policy

of Great Britain...........

...802

Ode to the Germans............. ....................304

Lines on a Picture of a Girl in the attitude of Prayer, by

the Artist Gruse, in the possession of Lady Stepney....306

Lines on the View from St. Leonard's..................808

The Dead Eagle. Written at Oran....................314

Song—" To Love in my Heart”.......................318

Lines written in a blank leaf of La Perouse's Voyages...320

The Pilgrim of Glencoe..............................

..323

Napoleon and the British Sailor....................

Benlomond ..........

......................

The Child and Hind.............................

.863

The Jilted Nymph.............

On getting home the Portrait of a Female Child. ......862

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* “I sit down to take a retrospect of my life. Why should the task make me sad ? Have I not many blessings and many friends ? Yes! thanks to God, very many. But life, when we look back upon it, has also many painful recollections ; and pain, when viewed either as past or to come, makes a deeper impression on the imagination than either the past pleasures or comforts of life that can be recalled. In the remembrance of our lives we are like unfair tradesmen, who omit a part of their debts in their balance of accounts. We resign ourselves to forget-myriads of the easy, tranquil, or even pleasing though anxious hours of our being ; but for an hour of pain we make a large charge in our estimate of compared misery and happiness. I do not think that it is a fair argument to urge against individual-comparative happiness, that because most of us, if the question were put-Would you wish to spend your life over again ?— would probably say—No,

* Retrospect of life, written by himself.

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