Posthumous memoirs of his own time by sir N.W. Wraxall

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Seite 78 - Hampden, that with dauntless breast The little tyrant of his fields withstood ; Some mute, inglorious Milton here may rest, Some Cromwell, guiltless of his country's blood. Th...
Seite 247 - there is more joy in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, than over ninety and nine just persons that need no repentance.
Seite 173 - His fall was destined to a barren strand, A petty fortress, and a dubious hand; He left the name, at which the world grew pale, To point a moral, or adorn a tale.
Seite 265 - Hamilton, who had already taken so active a part in Hastings's favour, being of opinion that the time named for the agitation of this great subject was not sufficiently distant, endeavoured to interpose some delay. Equally regardless of the effect which his speech might produce upon Pitt, or upon Burke, though connected by the closest ties of friendship with the former; in that imperious and dictatorial tone natural to him, he expressed his astonishment at the indecent precipitation which characterized...
Seite 175 - There are, indeed, three events in our history, which may be regarded as touchstones of party-men. An English Whig, who asserts the reality of the popish plot, an Irish Catholic, who denies the massacre in 1641, and a Scotch Jacobite, who maintains the innocence of Queen Mary, must be considered as men beyond the reach of argument or reason, and must be left to their prejudices.
Seite 204 - ... a moment's pause as to the ill purposes to which the decision of a chief justice might be perverted. It was not the office of a friend to mix the grave caution and cold circumspection of a judge with an opinion taken in such circumstances ; and Sir Elijah had previously...
Seite 163 - It is however a fact that the Duke performed, in his own drawingroom, the scene of Paris and the Goddesses. Three of the most beautiful females to be found in London presented themselves before him, precisely as the divinities of Homer are supposed to have appeared to Paris on Mount Ida ; while he, habited like ' the Dardan shepherd,' holding a gilded apple in his hand, conferred the prize on her whom he deemed the fairest.
Seite 320 - The question was put and carried. Mr. Frederick Montague then rose and moved, " That Mr. Burke, in the name of the House of Commons, and of all the Commons of Great Britain, do go to the bar of the House of Lords, and impeach Warren Hastings...
Seite 25 - ... prerogative of mercy. He felt the strongest impulse to save Dodd, not only on account of the numerous and powerful applications made in his favour, but as a clergyman who had been one of his own chaplains. The Earl of Mansfield, however, prevented so pernicious an act of grace. I have heard Lord Sackville recount the circumstances that took place in the council held on the occasion, at which the king assisted. To the firmness of the lord chief-justice, Dodd's execution was due: for, no sooner...
Seite 66 - O, for a muse of fire, that would ascend The brightest heaven of invention ! A kingdom for a stage, princes to act, And monarchs to behold the swelling scene ! Then should the warlike Harry, like himself, Assume the port of Mars ; and, at his heels, Leash'd in like hounds, should famine, sword, and fire, Crouch for employment.

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