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On thy third reign look down ; disclose our fate;
In what new station shall we fix our seat ?
When shall we next thy hallow'd altars raise,
And choirs of virgins celebrate thy praise ?

AN INSCRIPTION UPON A PUNCH-BOWL,

IN THE SOUTH SEA YEAR, FOR A CLUB,

CHASED WITH JUPITER PLACING CALLISTO IN THE

SKIES, AND EUROPA WITH THE BULL1

COME, fill the South Sea goblet full ;

The gods shall of our stock take care ; Europa pleas'd accepts the Bull,

And Jove with joy puts off the Bear.

LINES ON A GROTTO, AT CRUX-EASTON,

HANTS.

HERE shunning idleness at once and praise,
This radiant pile nine rural sisters? raise;

Now first printed, from the handwriting of Dr. Birch on a fly leaf of the first volume of Warburton's Pope's Works, formerly belonging to Cracherode, in the British Museum.

" This Epigram of Mr. Pope was communicated by the Revd. Dr. Warburton to

Tho. Birch." 2 The Misses Lisle.

The glittering emblem of each spotless dame,
Clear as her soul, and shining as her frame;
Beauty which nature only can impart,
And such a polish as disgraces art ;
But fate dispos’d them in this humble sort,
And hid in deserts what would charm a court.

ON BENTLEY'S MILTON.

Did Milton's prose, O Charles, thy death defend?
A furious foe unconscious proves a friend.
On Milton's verse did Bentley comment ? Know,
A weak officious friend becomes a foe.
While he but sought his author's fame to further,
The murderous critic has aveng’d thy murther.

LINES

All hail, once pleasing, once inspiring shade,

Scene of my youthful loves, and happier hours ! Where the kind Muses met me as I stray’d,

And gently press'd my hand, and said, Be ours. Take all thou e'er shalt have, a constant Muse:

At court thou mayst be lik’d, but nothing gain : Stocks thou mayst buy and sell, but always lose;

And love the brightest eyes, but love in vain.

TO ERINNA.

Though sprightly Sappho force our love and

praise, A softer wonder my pleas’d soul surveys, The mild Erinna, blushing in her bays. So, while the sun's broad beam yet strikes the

sight, All mild appears the moon's more sober light; Serene, in virgin majesty she shines, And, unobserv’d, the glaring sun declines.

ADRIANI MORIENTIS AD ANIMAM,

TRANSLATED.

An fleeting spirit! wandering fire,

That long hast warm’d my tender breast, Must thou no more this frame inspire,

No more a pleasing cheerful guest? Whither, ah whither art thou flying,

To what dark undiscover'd shore ? Thou seem'st all trembling, shivering, dyiny,

And wit and humour are no more !

1 See Memoir prefixed to these volumes, p. Ixx

A DIALOGUE.

POPE.

SINCE

my

old friend is grown so great,
As to be Minister of State,
I'm told, but 'tis not true I hope,
That Craggs will be asham'd of Pope.

CRAGGS.

Alas! if I am such a creature,
To

grow the worse for growing greater,
Why, faith, in spite of all my brags,
'Tis Pope must be asham'd of Craggs.

ODE TO QUINBUS FLESTRIN, THE MAN MOUNTAIN, BY TITTY TIT, POET LAUREATE TO

INIS MAJESTY OF LILLIPUT.

TRANSLATED

INTO ENGLISH.

In amaze
Lost I gaze!
Can our eyes
Reach thy size!
May my lays
Swell with praise,

This Ode, and the three following pieces, were produced by Pope on reading Gulliver's Travels.

Worthy thee!
Worthy me!
Muse, inspire
All thy fire!
Bards of old
Of him told,
When they said
Atlas' head

Propp'd the skies:
See! and believe your eyes !

See him stride
Valleys wide,
Over woods,
Over foods!
When lie treads,
Mountains' heads
Groan and shake;
Armies quake;

Lest his spurn

Overturn
Man and steed:
Troops, take heed!
Left and right,
Speed your flight!

Lest an host
Beneath his foot be lost!

Turn'd aside
From his hide
Safe from wound,
Darts rebound.

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