The New England Quarterly Magazine, Band 2

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Seite 54 - WHEN I wrote my treatise about our system, I had an eye upon such principles as might work with considering men for the belief of a Deity ; and nothing can rejoice me more than to find it useful for that purpose.
Seite 51 - Read Don Quixote ; it is a very '* good book — I read it ftill.
Seite 133 - Of Camball, and of Algarsife, And who had Canace to wife, That own'd the virtuous ring and glass; And of the wondrous horse of brass, On which the Tartar king did ride...
Seite 49 - It raiseth admiration, as signifying a nimble sagacity of apprehension, a special felicity of invention, a vivacity of spirit, and reach of wit more than vulgar; it seeming to argue a rare quickness of parts, that one can fetch in remote conceits applicable; a notable skill, that he can dexterously accommodate them to the purpose before him; together with a lively briskness of humour, not apt to damp those sportful flashes of imagination.
Seite 108 - For it was not an enemy that reproached me ; Then I could have borne it : Neither was it he that hated me that did magnify himself against me ; Then I would have hid myself from him : But it was thou, a man mine equal, My guide, and mine acquaintance. We took sweet counsel together, And walked unto the house of God in company.
Seite 64 - I have regularly and attentively perused these Holy Scriptures, and am of opinion that this volume, independently of its divine origin, contains more true sublimity, more exquisite beauty, more pure morality, more important history, and finer strains of poetry and eloquence, than can be collected from all other books, in whatever age or language they may have been written.
Seite 92 - I have received two letters from you, one written in Latin, the other in French ; which I take in good part, and will you to exercise that practice of learning often : for that will stand you in most stead, in that profession of life that you are born to live in. And...
Seite 49 - ... from a lucky hitting upon what is strange, sometimes from a crafty wresting obvious matter to the purpose; often it consisteth in one knows not what and springeth up one can hardly tell how. Its ways are unaccountable and inexplicable, being answerable to the numberless rovings of fancy and windings of language.
Seite 49 - It is indeed a thing so versatile and multiform, appearing in so many shapes, so many postures, so many garbs, so variously apprehended by several eyes and judgments, that it seemeth no less hard to settle a clear...
Seite 182 - ... fore againft my heart, unto poor babes in tearing from them the half-eaten apples, which they privily munched at church. But verily it pitied me, for I remembered the days of my youth. Thirdly, with the fweat of my own hands...

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