Social Aspects of Education: A Book of Sources and Original Discussions with Annotated Bibliographies

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Macmillan, 1912 - 425 Seiten
 

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Seite 238 - By primary groups I mean those characterized by intimate face-to-face association and co-operation. They are primary in several senses, but chiefly in that they are fundamental in forming the social nature and ideals of the individual. The result of intimate association, psychologically, is a certain fusion of individualities in a common whole, so that one's very self, for many purposes at least, is the common life and purpose of the group. Perhaps the simplest way of describing this wholeness is...
Seite 206 - What the best and wisest parent wants for his own child, that must the community want for all of its children. Any other ideal for our schools is narrow and unlovely ; acted upon, it destroys our democracy.
Seite 337 - Inwendig lernt kein Mensch sein Innerstes Erkennen; denn er mißt nach eignem Maß Sich bald zu klein und leider oft zu groß. Der Mensch erkennt sich nur im Menschen, nur Das Leben lehret jedem, was er sei.
Seite 59 - To bring into closer relation the home and the school, that parents and teachers may cooperate intelligently in the training of the child, and to develop between educators and the general public such united efforts as will secure for every child the highest advantages in physical, mental, social, and spiritual education.
Seite 105 - It is too late ! Ah, nothing is too late Till the tired heart shall cease to palpitate.
Seite 105 - CEdipus, and Simonides Bore off the prize of verse from his compeers, When each had numbered more than fourscore years, And Theophrastus, at fourscore and ten, Had but begun his Characters of Men.
Seite 208 - Those of us who are here to-day need go back only one, two, or at the most three, generations, to find a time when the household was practically the center in which were carried on, or about which were clustered, all the typical forms of industrial occupation. The clothing worn was for the most part not only made in the house, but the members of the household were usually familiar with the shearing of the sheep, the carding and spinning of the wool, and the plying of the loom. Instead of pressing...
Seite ii - THE MACMILLAN COMPANY NEW YORK ' BOSTON ' CHICAGO DALLAS ' SAN FRANCISCO MACMILLAN & CO., LIMITED LONDON ' BOMBAY ' CALCUTTA MELBOURNE THE MACMILLAN CO. OF CANADA, LTD. TORONTO OF EDUCATION A BOOK OF SOURCES AND ORIGINAL DISCUSSIONS WITH ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHIES BY IRVING KING, PH.D.
Seite 239 - The most important spheres of this intimate association and cooperation — though by no means the only ones — are the family, the play-group of children, and the neighborhood or community group of elders. These are practically universal, belonging to all times and all stages of development; and are accordingly a chief basis of what is universal in human nature and human ideals.
Seite 213 - The introduction of active occupations, of nature study, of elementary science, of art, of history; the relegation of the merely symbolic and formal to a secondary position; the change in the moral school atmosphere, in the relation of pupils and teachers — of discipline; the introduction of more active, expressive, and selfdirecting factors — all these are not mere accidents, they are necessities of the larger social evolution.

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