The Life of the Learned and Right Reverend Reynold Pecock, S. T. P., Lord Bishop of St. Asaph, and Chichester, in the Reign of King Henry VI.

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Clarendon Press, 1820 - 235 Seiten

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Seite 154 - Let both grow together until the harvest, and in the time of harvest I will say to the reapers, Gather ye together first the tares, and bind them in bundles to burn them: but gather the wheat into my barn.
Seite 193 - The words of the wise are as goads, and as nails fastened by the masters of assemblies, which are given from one shepherd.
Seite 93 - If, therefore, the pope should attempt anything against the king by process, or other matters in deed, the king with all his subjects, should with all their force and power resist the same.
Seite 89 - I know any such to be moved or compassed, I shall resist it to my power, and as soon as I can I shall advertise him, or such as may give him knowledge. The rules of the holy fathers, the decrees, ordinances, sentences, dispositions, reservations, provisions, and commandments apostolic, to my power I shall keep, and cause to be kept of others. Heretics, schismatics, and rebels to our holy father, and his successors, I shall resist and persecute to my power.
Seite 110 - If any man teach otherwise, and consent not to wholesome words, even the words of our Lord Jesus Christ, and to the doctrine which is according to godliness, he is proud, knowing nothing...
Seite 4 - For though he could have seen suddenly by miracle the difference between divers colours, yet could he not by the sight so suddenly tell the names of all these colours but if he had known them before, no more than the names of all the men that he should suddenly see.
Seite 140 - ... the greater and more necessary articles of faith, and all genuine and rational knowledge of religion, had generally given place to fabulous legends, and romantic stories, fables which, in this respect, only differed from those of the ancient heathen poets, that they were more incredible, and less elegant.
Seite 225 - I haue spoke oft tyme and bi long leiser with the wittiest " and kunnyngist men of thilk seid soort contrarie to the
Seite 4 - ... worship to himself nor to be proud of the people's praise, which would call him a good and a godly man thereby), at last he looked well upon his eyen, and asked whether he could never see nothing at all in all his life before.
Seite 51 - And the law of reason or human nature is that which men by discourse of natural reason have rightly found out themselves to be all for ever bound unto in their actions.

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