John O' Arnha': to which is Added The Murderit Mynstrell, and Other Poems

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J. Smith, 1826 - 99 Seiten
 

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Seite 5 - O'er a' the ills o' life victorious! But pleasures are like poppies spread, You seize the flow'r, its bloom is shed; Or like the snow falls in the river, A moment white — then melts for ever; Or like the borealis race That flit ere you can point their place; Or like the rainbow's lovely form Evanishing amid the storm. Nae man can tether time or tide; The hour approaches Tam maun ride; That hour, o...
Seite 5 - And sic a night he taks the road in As ne'er poor sinner was abroad in. The wind blew as 'twad blawn its last ; The rattling...
Seite 11 - But those that write in rhyme still make The one verse for the other's sake ; For one for sense, and one for rhyme, I think's sufficient at one time.
Seite 6 - Whom his ain son o' life bereft, The grey hairs yet stack to the heft ; Wi' mair o' horrible and awfu', Which ev"n to name wad be unlawfu'. As Tammie glowr'd, amaz'd, and curious, The mirth and fun grew fast and furious : The piper loud and louder blew ; The dancers quick and quicker flew ; They...
Seite 52 - ... praise, — that every ear is open to imbibe the oracular breathings of his inspiration. Even when he would fain convince us that his soul is wholly occupied with some other illustrious character, he breaks out into laudatory exclamations concerning himself; no sound is so sweet to him as that of his own voice; the ground is hallowed on which his footsteps tread; and there seems to him something more than human in his very shadow.
Seite 6 - Nae cotillion brent new frae France, But hornpipes, jigs, strathspeys, and reels Put life and mettle in their heels: A winnock-bunker in the east, There sat auld Nick, in shape o' beast; A towzie tyke, black, grim, and large, To gie them music was his charge: He screw'd the pipes and gart them skirl, Till roof and rafters a...
Seite 53 - His admiration of nature or of man, we had almost said his religious feelings towards his God, are all narrowed, weakened, and corrupted, and poisoned by inveterate and diseased egotism ; and instead of his mind reflecting the beauty and glory of nature, he seems to consider the mighty universe itself as nothing better than a mirror in which, with a grinning and idiot self-complacency, he may contemplate the Physiognomy of Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Though he has yet done nothing in any one department...
Seite 52 - ... concerning himself ; no sound is so sweet to him as that of his own voice ; the ground is hallowed on which his footsteps tread ; and there seems to him something more than human in his very shadow. He will read no books that other people read ; his scorn is as misplaced and extravagant as his admiration ; opinions that seem to tally with his own wild ravings are holy and inspired ; and unless agreeable to his creed, the wisdom of ages is folly ; and wits, whom the world worship, dwarfed when...
Seite 53 - ... illustrious Spirits, but to unite, in his own mighty intellect, all the glorious powers and faculties by which they were separately distinguished, as if his soul were endowed with all human power, and was the depository of the aggregate, or rather the essence of all human knowledge. So deplorable a delusion as this, has only been equalled by that of Joanna Southcote, who mistook a complaint in the bowels for the divine afflatus ; and believed herself about to give birth to the regenerator of...
Seite 50 - They promised for thee that thou should'st eschew All low desires, all empty vanities ; That thou should'st, still to truth and freedom true, The applause or censure of the herd despise ; And in obedience to their impulse given, Walk in the light of Nature and of Heaven.

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